Event Oracle - The Oracle knows all

BEST Things To Do In London

The Event Oracle knows ALL the fun things to do in London. Select your date above then scroll down to check out what events are going on this week...

  • Medieval and Renaissance Tour

    Victoria and Albert Museum
    Cromwell Road
    London, SW7 2RL
    Medieval and Renaissance Tour

    The Medieval & Renaissance Galleries are home to one of the world's most remarkable collections of treasures from the period, ranging from delicately carved ivories and intricate metalwork to Leonardo da Vinci's notebooks and powerful sculptures

  • Laughing Matters: The State of a Nation

    Victoria and Albert Museum
    Cromwell Road
    London, SW7 2RL
    Laughing Matters: The State of a Nation

    Through over 30 objects, ranging from costumes to scripts, from puppets to music, this display unpicks the punchlines to discover what humour since the Victorian era – whether subversive, surreal, mocking or celebratory – can tell us about what it means to be British today.

  • Undercover: Life in Churchill's Bunker

    Churchill War Rooms
    Clive Steps, King Charles St, Westminster
    London, SW1A 2AQ
    Undercover: Life in Churchill's Bunker

    Discover the stories of the staff who spent thousands of vital working – and sleeping – hours from 1938 onwards at the Cabinet War Rooms.

    See historic images, objects and interviews with the men and women who worked in the underground hideaway, revealing what it was like to work in secret alongside Winston Churchill during the Second World War.

  • The EY Exhibition Van Gogh and Britain

    Tate Britain
    Millbank, Westminster
    London, SW1P 4RG
    The EY Exhibition Van Gogh and Britain

    The EY Exhibition: Van Gogh and Britain presents the largest collection of Van Gogh’s paintings in the UK for nearly a decade. Some of his most famous works will be brought together from around the world – including Shoes, Starry Night on the Rhône, L'Arlésienne, and two works he made while a patient at the Saint-Paul Asylum, At Eternity’s Gate and Prisoners Exercising. They will be joined by the very rarely lent Sunflowers from London’s National Gallery.

    Van Gogh lived in England as a young man for several crucial years. He walked the streets alone, dreaming of the future. He fell in love with British culture, especially the novels of Charles Dickens and George Eliot. And he was inspired by the art he saw here, including paintings by Constable and Millais which are featured in the exhibition. They affected his paintings throughout his career.

    The exhibition also looks at the British artists who were inspired by Van Gogh, including Francis Bacon, David Bomberg, and the young Camden Town painters. It shows how his vision set British artists on the road to modern art.

  • Van Gogh and Britain at Tate Britain

    Tate Britain
    Millbank
    London, SW1P 4RG
    Van Gogh and Britain at Tate Britain

    This major exhibition brings together 45 works by Vincent van Gogh to reveal how he was inspired by Britain and how he inspired British artists Van Gogh and Britain presents the largest collection of Van Gogh's paintings in the UK for nearly a decade. Some of his most famous works will be brought together from around the world - including Shoes, Starry Night on the Rhone, L'Arlesienne, and two works he made while a patient at the Saint-Paul Asylum, At Eternity's Gate and Prisoners Exercising. They will be joined by the very rarely lent Sunflowers from London's National Gallery. Van Gogh lived in England as a young man for several crucial years. He walked the streets alone, dreaming of the future. He fell in love with British culture, especially the novels of Charles Dickens and George Eliot. And he was inspired by the art he saw here, including paintings by Constable and Millais which are featured in the exhibition. They affected his paintings throughout his career. The exhibition also looks at the British artists who were inspired by Van Gogh, including Francis Bacon, David Bomberg, and the young Camden Town painters. It shows how his vision set British artists on the road to modern art.

  • Mary Quant

    Victoria and Albert Museum
    Cromwell Road
    London, SW7 2RL
    Mary Quant

    From miniskirts and hot pants to vibrant tights and makeup, discover how Mary Quant launched a fashion revolution on the British high street, with over 200 garments and accessories, including unseen pieces from the designer's personal archive.

  • Bridget Harvey: Textile and Repair Artist

    Victoria and Albert Museum
    Cromwell Road
    London, SW7 2RL
    Bridget Harvey: Textile and Repair Artist

    Bridget Harvey is exploring the politics of making and repairing through the mediums of textiles and ceramics inspired by objects in the V&A collection. Visit her onsite studio to learn more about her skills of repair-making and collaborative working and the relationship between repair and the museum.

  • Keith Haring

    Tate Britain
    Millbank, Westminster
    London, SW1P 4RG
    Keith Haring

    Join us for the first, major UK exhibition of artist and activist Keith Haring (1958–1990). Visitors can enjoy more than 85 artworks including large, vibrant paintings and drawings.

    A part of the legendary New York art scene of 1980s, Haring was a champion of his generation’s counterculture. He was inspired by graffiti, pop art and underground club culture. Haring worked with like-minded artists such as Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat. All were interested in creating art for the many. They used new media and public spaces, not galleries to do so.

    Discover how activism played a key role in Haring’s art. Compelled to speak for his generation, his art responds to urgent issues including political dictatorship, racism, homophobia, drug addiction, AIDS awareness, capitalism and the environment.

    Also on display are posters, photographs, and videos that capture the vibrancy of 1980s New York street culture that Haring embraced and reflected.

  • The Vulcan and Cold War Experience

    Royal Air Force Museum
    Grahame Park Way
    London, NW9 5LL
    The Vulcan and Cold War Experience

    Ticket holders will have the chance to explore two of the Cold War’s most iconic aircraft; the Avro Vulcan B.2. and the McDonnell Douglas Phantom FGR.2, which between them tell a story of uncertainty and tension that loomed over the world for decades. You will gain special access to both these mighty warriors, and allow you to climb in to and take a seat in the cockpit of the Vulcan and the pilot’s seat of the Phantom. This is a rare opportunity to experience what it was like to fly these great aircraft. Ticket holders will also be given a full ground tour, with the chance to get up and close to other significant Cold War aircraft, including the BAC Lightning F.6, the Handley Page Victor K2, and the English Electric Canberra PR3, and hear fascinating real-life stories of the people who flew the aircraft.

  • Frank Bowling

    Tate Britain
    Millbank, Westminster
    London, SW1P 4RG
    Frank Bowling

    This exhibition offers a chance to experience the entirety of Bowling’s 60-year career. It showcases his sensual use of colour and bold experimentation.

    Born in Guyana (then British Guiana) in 1934, at 19 years old Bowling moved to London. He went on to study painting at the Royal College of Art alongside David Hockney and R.B. Kitaj.

    After graduating with a silver medal, he spent the next 60 years criss-crossing the Atlantic between studios in London and New York. Maturing into a master of his medium, he developed a visionary approach that fuses abstraction with personal memories. Now 85 he still paints every day, experimenting with new materials and techniques.

    The exhibition brings together a lifetime of large-scale artworks. It includes key series such as the iconic 'map paintings', the visually arresting ‘poured paintings’ made by pouring paint down an inclined surface, and the sculptural paintings of the 1980s evoking riverbeds, all the way to mature work selected from a recent period of explosive productivity.​

  • Cairo Streets

    Victoria and Albert Museum
    Cromwell Road
    London, SW7 2RL
    Cairo Streets

    This display brings visitors face to face with everyday life in Cairo in the 19th century, through historic photographs of local people going about their daily lives. It also features examples of turned wood window screens, called mashrabiyyah, which gave a characteristic visual flavour to Cairo’s streets.

  • Allard Van Hoorn Urban Songlines 2009–19

    Tate Britain
    Millbank, Westminster
    London, SW1P 4RG
    Allard Van Hoorn Urban Songlines 2009–19

    He recently undertook a residency in St Ives as part of the Tate St Ives Artists Programme.

    This exhibition presents a series of short films documenting projects from ten years of van Hoorn’s Urban Songlines series. 'Songlines' is a spiritual system of songs and storytelling relating to land practiced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia. Influenced by this tradition, van Hoorn researches and consults with communities around the world to produce Urban Songlines projects. They result in performances, scores or audio recordings, focusing on our relationship to place and the public domain.

    Van Hoorn’s latest work, 063 Urban Songline (Another Hurling of the Silver Ball) | Latitude: 50.204794° N – 50.214926° N / Longitude: -5.482636° W – -5.493938° W 2019, is based on the annual St Ives Feast Day tradition of ‘hurling’, where a small silver ball is chased through the town. Recreating the ball at a much greater scale, van Hoorn has collaborated with residents to invent a unique journey through St Ives. Following a live performance, audio extracts from the work will be played throughout the summer at Tate St Ives and a film of the event will be shown as part of this exhibition.

  • Manners and Modernity: Ukiyo-e and etiquette on the Seibu Railway

    Victoria and Albert Museum
    Cromwell Road
    London, SW7 2RL
    Manners and Modernity: Ukiyo-e and etiquette on the Seibu Railway

    Featuring courtesans, Kabuki actors and other images found in ukiyo-e woodblock prints the posters illustrate the bustle and thrill of city life in modern Japan. Humour tempers the message about how to be a well-behaved commuter. The display includes original ukiyo-e prints which depict some of the artistic influences that inspired the posters.

  • Brick Wonders

    Horniman Museum and Gardens
    100 London Rd, Forest Hill
    London, SE23 3PQ
    Brick Wonders

    From an ancient Egyptian pyramid to Old London Bridge, and from the natural wonder of a coral reef to the modern marvel of the international space station, travel through history and explore over 50 models made using half a million LEGO® bricks.

    Discover how and why people model the world, build your imagination at the interactive play areas, and don’t miss two Horniman icons created especially for the show.

    More than 50 models will be on show, from individual pieces that will inspire visitors to build them at home, to awe-inspiring dioramas and mosaics. Visitors can build their own brick wonders in interactive play areas – including a graffiti wall, build areas and big bricks for little hands – and the exhibition includes a mini-cinema showing short LEGO® animations.

  • Smoke and Mirrors: The Psychology of Magic

    Wellcome Collection
    183 Euston Rd
    London, NW1 2BE
    Smoke and Mirrors: The Psychology of Magic

    Explore how our biases affect our perception and whether our senses can be hacked. Discover spirit photography, magic props and psychology experiments to see how magic works on – and in – the mind of the spectator.

    Artefacts on display from the world of magic include the head of the gorilla costume worn by Derren Brown, Harry Houdini’s ‘Bell Box’, Tommy Cooper’s fez, and Paul Daniels’s sawing-in-half box.

  • Portmeirion: Pottery Trendsetter

    Victoria and Albert Museum
    Cromwell Road
    London, SW7 2RL
    Portmeirion: Pottery Trendsetter

    Portmeirion is a British success story. Its innovative designs have set trends in the pottery industry over six decades. The company has thrived at a time when many of its famous, long-established rivals have not managed to survive. 2018 marks the centenary of the birth of Susan Williams-Ellis (1918-2007), founder of the pottery, whose classic designs include ‘Totem’, ‘Magic City’ and the ever-popular ‘Botanic Garden’.

  • Immersive Histories: Dambusters

    Royal Air Force Museum
    Grahame Park Way
    London, NW9 5LL
    Immersive Histories: Dambusters

    Step back in time to the early hours of 17 May 1943 and on board Lancaster G-George to join the Dambusters on their legendary mission.

    Using the latest virtual reality and haptic technology, in conjunction with a physical 1:1 recreation of the interior of the iconic Avro Lancaster bomber, experience key events from the Dambusters Raid as never before. Witness decisive moments play out before you as you explore the aircraft piloted by Wing Commander Guy Gibson DSO and Bar, DFC and Bar.

  • War Brides

    Royal Air Force Museum
    Grahame Park Way
    London, NW9 5LL
    War Brides

    Global conflict and the mobilisation of troops during the Second World War brought couples together who would never have met in that era. Although marriage was discouraged by the military, tens of thousands of locals married foreign nationals on active duty. Couples met on the dance floor, on air bases, blind dates, in queues, hospitals or air raid shelters. For war brides, a new husband meant a new country.

    Artist Bev Tosh is the daughter of a Royal New Zealand Air Force pilot and his Canadian war bride. Her works portray war brides of airmen stationed on Royal Air Force bases in the UK during the Second World War and Canadian brides of ‘flyboys’ from England, Australia and New Zealand trained in Canada. 

    Collectively these portraits and stories speak across continents and generations of an extraordinary post-war emigration of women who made a leap of faith for the love of an airman.

  • Bartolomé Bermejo: Master of the Spanish Renaissance

    The National Gallery
    Trafalgar Square,
    Charing Cross
    Charing Cross
    London, WC2N 5DN
    Bartolomé Bermejo: Master of the Spanish Renaissance

    See the dazzling works of Spanish 15th-century genius, Bartolomé Bermejo

    Little is known about the enigmatic Bermejo, but he was one of Spain’s most innovative and accomplished painters active in the second half of the 15th century.

    This exhibition brings together six of Bermejo’s paintings that have never been seen outside of Spain, including the triptych of the 'Madonna of Montserrat' from the cathedral at Acqui Terme, Alessandria (Italy) and the 'Piedad Desplà' from Barcelona Cathedral.

    In addition, our own magnificent 'Saint Michael Triumphs over the Devil', returns on display following its year-long conservation; unveiling the painting’s exquisite details and the extent of Bermejo’s artistry.  

  • Roman London family walk

    Museum of London
    150 London Wall, Barbican
    London, EC2Y 5HN
    Roman London family walk

    Go back 2,000 years and walk the streets of Roman Londinium! Visit the remains of the Roman city wall, the location of a long lost fort and Londinium’s hidden amphitheatre, where brave gladiators and nimble acrobats entertained the raucous crowds, on this interactive tour for families.

  • Britain 1500-1900 Tour

    Victoria and Albert Museum
    Cromwell Road
    London, SW7 2RL
    Britain 1500-1900 Tour

    One of our knowledgeable V&A Volunteer Guides will introduce you to the V&A's stunning Britain Galleries which house the most comprehensive collection of British design and artworks in the world.

  • Mike Nelson: The Asset Strippers

    Tate Britain
    Millbank, Westminster
    London, SW1P 4RG
    Mike Nelson: The Asset Strippers

    Mike Nelson has transformed the grand spaces of the Duveen Galleries into something between a sculpture court and an asset strippers’ warehouse. He has carefully selected objects from the post-war Britain that framed his childhood – including enormous knitting machines, woodwork stripped from a former army barracks, graffitied steel awnings and doors from an NHS hospital.

    Nelson’s project has been informed by the Duveen Galleries’ origins as the first purpose-built sculpture galleries in England, intended to rival the sculpture court at the British Museum and the V&A’s Cast Courts. It turns the neo-classical galleries into a warehouse of monuments to a lost era and the vision of society it represented.

    Nelson is interested in the cultural and social contexts behind the objects he has selected, as well as their material qualities. He explains

    Their manipulation and arrangement subtly shift them from what they once were into sculpture, and then back again to what they are – examples of the machines and equipment left over from industry and infrastructure. The exhibition weaves this allusion with that of British history. It presents us with a vision of artefacts cannibalised from the last days of the industrial era in place of the treasures of empire that would normally adorn such halls.

    The annual Tate Britain Commission invites artists to create a new artwork in response to the grand space of the Duveen Galleries. Artists who have previously undertaken commissions in the Duveens at Tate Britain include Anthea Hamilton, Cerith Wyn Evans and Pablo Bronstein.

  • Fly Kids

    Science Museum
    Exhibition Road, South Kensington
    London, SW7 2DD
    Fly Kids

    Take off with the Red Arrows!

    Fly Kids is a pay-as-you-go flight simulator that lets your child experience the sights and sounds of flying with the Red Arrows during one of their aerobatic displays.

  • BMW Tate Live Exhibition

    Tate Britain
    Millbank, Westminster
    London, SW1P 4RG
    BMW Tate Live Exhibition

    In 2020 Tate Modern’s Tanks will again play host to an exciting series of installations and live performances.

    In 2019, Anne Imhof created a new large-scale commission, Sex. 2018 celebrated the performance pioneer Joan Jonas, while the first exhibition in 2017 included work from a range of artists including Isabel Lewis, CAMP, Wu Tsang, Fred Moten and Fujiko Nakaya.

  • ARTIST ROOMS: Jenny Holzer

    Tate Britain
    Millbank, Westminster
    London, SW1P 4RG
    ARTIST ROOMS: Jenny Holzer

    American artist Jenny Holzer presents statements that can provoke strong responses. Whether encountered on city streets or in art galleries, Holzer's work asks us to consider the words and messages that surround us. Her art takes many forms, including stone benches, projections, signs, posters, paintings, plaques and textiles. Words are central to her work, whether pasted on a wall, flickering from an electronic sign, carved in granite or stitched in wool.

    Her texts can be forceful and apparently simple, but may contradict one another. They are not necessarily straightforward expressions of the artist’s views. Truisms, Holzer’s first text series, is a survey of belief.

    Holzer has described her aims:

    I wanted a lot simultaneously: to leave art outside for the public, to be a painter of mysterious yet ordered works, to be explicit but not didactic, to find the right subjects, to transform spaces, to disorient and transfix people, to offer up beauty, to be funny and never lie.

    Early in her career, Holzer delivered messages on posters and T-shirts so they would be seen in everyday places rather than in museums and galleries. Her work addresses the information overload and multiple perspectives we read daily. Eye-catching or quiet and lyrical, Holzer's art invites us to read and interpret for ourselves.

  • FOOD: Bigger than the Plate

    Victoria and Albert Museum
    Cromwell Road
    London, SW7 2RL
    FOOD: Bigger than the Plate

    From gastronomic experiments to urban farming, this exhibition brings together the politics and pleasure of food to ask how the collective choices we make can lead to a more sustainable, just and delicious food future.

  • Magic Realism Art in Weimar Germany 1919-33

    Tate Britain
    Millbank, Westminster
    London, SW1P 4RG
     Magic Realism Art in Weimar Germany 1919-33

    Tate Modern will explore German art from between the wars in a year-long, free exhibition, drawing upon the rich holdings of The George Economou Collection.

    These loans offer a rare opportunity to view a range of artworks not ordinarily on public display, and to see a small selection of key Tate works returned to the context in which they were originally created and exhibited nearly one hundred years ago.

    This presentation explores the diverse practices of a number of different artists, including Otto Dix, George Grosz, Albert Birkle and Jeanne Mammen. Although the term ‘magic realism’ is today commonly associated with the literature of Latin America, it was inherited from the artist and critic Franz Roh who invented it in 1925 to describe a shift from the art of the expressionist era, towards cold veracity and unsettling imagery. In the context of growing political extremism, the new realism reflected a fluid social experience as well as inner worlds of emotion and magic.

  • Takis

    Tate Britain
    Millbank, Westminster
    London, SW1P 4RG
    Takis

    Over a 70-year career, Takis (Panayiotis Vassilakis, born 1925) has created some of the most innovative art of the 20th century.

    Takis's work seeks out the essential poetry and beauty of the electromagnetic universe. He was one of the most original artistic voices in Europe from the 1960s and remains a pioneering figure today.

    This the largest exhibition of Takis's work ever held in the UK, bringing together over 70 works. Throughout his career he has produced antennae-like sculptures he calls Signals, and musical devices using magnets, electricity and viewer participation to generate resonant and random sounds. Such inventions earned Takis the admiration of the international avant-garde, ranging from the American Beat poets to artists such as Marcel Duchamp.

    At Tate Modern visitors will encounter forests of Signal sculptures and magnetic objects inspired by radar. The thunderous sounds of Takis’s Musicales, his Silver Musical Sphere and his Gong will complete the journey.

  • Driverless: Who is in control?

    Science Museum
    Exhibition Road, South Kensington
    London, SW7 2DD
     Driverless: Who is in control?

    Technology developers are racing to create fully autonomous machines with the ability to make decisions on their own. How many of these smart machines already exist? And how much control are we willing to transfer to them?

    Discover more in this cutting-edge exhibition through interactive exhibits, thought-provoking objects and even a retro robot car. Driverless will give you a unique glimpse into the AI-driven tech that could shape the habits, behaviour and society of tomorrow. 

    Highlights include self-driving cars, autonomous flying drones and smart underwater vehicles like the Autosub Long Range Boaty McBoatface.

  • Ideas Depot

    Tate Britain
    Millbank, Westminster
    London, SW1P 4RG
    Ideas Depot

    Ideas Depot is a new display that has been co-curated with primary school teachers across the city. Discover major works from the Tate collection by artists including Anya Gallaccio, ​Salvador Dalí and Chris Ofili. Central to this display is a belief that art plays a meaningful part in people’s day-to-day lives and intellectual curiosity.

    Through art we can always learn something new – about history, the world and our place in it. Works will be swapped in and out as the primary schools in residence pick and choose new ones from the art stores.

    The display has developed alongside a joint research project with Edge Hill University's Faculty of Education, focused on developing a 'schools in residence' programme.

  • Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams

    Victoria and Albert Museum
    Cromwell Road
    London, SW7 2RL
    Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams

    Spanning 1947 to the present day, this exhibition traces the history and impact of one of the 20th century's most influential couturiers, exploring the enduring influence of the fashion house, and Dior's relationship with Britain.

  • Changing the Guard at Buckingham Palace

    Buckingham Palace
    London, SW1A 1AA
    Changing the Guard at Buckingham Palace

    The Changing the Guard ceremony at Buckingham Palace follows a traditional format that is the basis for guard changing ceremonies which take place at other Palaces and Royal Residences.

    The Old Guard (the soldiers currently on duty) form up in front of the palace and are relieved by the New Guard which arrives from Wellington Barracks. The New Guard is accompanied by a Band. The ceremony represents a formal handover of responsibilities.

    The Guard at Buckingham Palace is typically provided by one of the five Foot Guards Regiments of the Household Division, identified by the number of buttons on their distinctive tunics and the plume in their bearskin caps.

    You will notice that soldiers of both the Old Guard and New Guard carry regimental flags. Known as Colours, these traditionally served as regimental emblems which provided rallying points in battle. Today, they carry regimental distinctions or battle honours emblazoned on them.

  • Greenwich+Docklands International Festival

    King William Walk
    Greenwich
    London, SE10 9HT
    Greenwich+Docklands International Festival

    See the world differently with innovative art productions, UK premieres and family activities at the Greenwich+Docklands International Festival (GDIF), which takes place across Royal Greenwich, Docklands and Tower Hamlets.

    Part of Royal Greenwich Festivals, the annual festival of outdoor theatre and performing arts presents an extensive programme of art installations, street theatre, circus, dance acts and music events, produced by UK and international artists.

    This year’s festival is made up of more than 130 performances, which celebrate dreams of love, struggle, ambition and flight, as well as a number of major anniversaries.

  • Behind-the-Scenes Tour: Spirit Collection

    The Natural History Museum
    Cromwell Road
    London, SW7 5BD
    Behind-the-Scenes Tour: Spirit Collection

    Go behind the scenes with our knowledgable science educators for a look at the Museum's fascinating zoology collection preserved in spirit.

    As we explore some of the Darwin Centre’s 27 kilometres of shelves, you’ll encounter numerous treasures hidden among the 22 million animal specimens housed here.

    You’ll meet Archie, our 8.62-metre-long giant squid, view specimens collected by Charles Darwin himself and learn more about our cutting-edge research.

  • Underbelly Festival in South Bank

    Capital Tower
    91 Waterloo Road
    London, SE1 8RT
    Underbelly Festival in South Bank

    Enjoy a fun-packed festival of live entertainment and alfresco eating and drinking at Underbelly Festival in South Bank.

    Stretching throughout the summer, the festival returns for the 11th year with stages full of affordable circus, theatre, cabaret, comedy, music and children’s shows on the south bank of the Thames.

    You can also drop by the free-to-enter festival site to tuck into street food from the riverside vendors and grab a drink at one of London’s biggest outdoor bars, including the Rekorderlig Botanicals bar and Pimm’s Hut.

  • The Spitfire Experience - Cockpit Tour

    Royal Air Force Museum
    Grahame Park Way
    London, NW9 5LL
    The Spitfire Experience - Cockpit Tour

    Climb inside the Spitfire MK16 and take the pilot’s seat, learn about the aircraft and see what it would have been like to fly a Spitfire.

  • Little Swifts

    Royal Air Force Museum
    Grahame Park Way
    London, NW9 5LL
    Little Swifts

    Our fun and lively Little Swifts sessions, for children aged 2-5 years, are linked to our amazing collection.
    Tuesdays include a fun-packed hour of drama, dance and music. A magical session that gets all children participating!
    Thursdays include stories, songs and messy play. A lively session that gets children exploring!

  • Huguette Caland

    Tate Britain
    Millbank, Westminster
    London, SW1P 4RG
    Huguette Caland

    Shifting between figuration and abstraction, Caland's large, colourful canvases and detailed drawings from the 1970s and 1980s will offer a delicate balance between the suggestive and the explicit.

    After moving to Paris from Beirut in 1970, Caland achieved artistic recognition with her exuberant and erotically charged paintings that challenged traditional conventions of beauty and desire. The female physique is a recurrent motif in her work, often painted like landscapes with voids and mountain-like forms.

    Born in Lebanon in 1931, Caland studied art at the American University of Beirut and lived in Paris and California for many years.

  • Natalia Goncharova

    Tate Britain
    Millbank, Westminster
    London, SW1P 4RG
    Natalia Goncharova

    Tate Modern will present the first retrospective of Natalia Goncharova ever held in the UK. Most of the works have never been seen in this country before.

    Goncharova found acclaim early in her career. Aged just 32 she established herself as the leader of the Russian avant-garde with a major exhibition in Moscow in 1913. She then moved to France where she designed costumes and backdrops for Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballet Russes. She lived in Paris for the rest of her life, becoming a key figure in the city’s cutting-edge art scene.

    Goncharova’s artistic output was immense, wide-ranging and at times controversial. She paraded the streets of Moscow displaying futurist body art and created monumental religious paintings. She took part in avant-garde cinema, experimented with book designs and designed for fashion houses in Moscow and Paris.

    Her bold and innovative body of work influenced and transcended the art movements of the 20th century. The exhibition will explore her diverse sources and inspirations, from Russian folk art and textiles to the latest trends in modernism and beyond.