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BEST Events In London

The Event Oracle knows ALL the fun things to do in London. Select your date above then scroll down to check out what events are going on this week...

  • Jutland 1916: WWI's Greatest Sea Battle at the National Maritime Museum Greenwich


    London, SE10 9NF
    Jutland 1916: WWI's Greatest Sea Battle at the National Maritime Museum Greenwich

    Mark 100 years since the major naval clash with Jutland 1916: WWI’s Greatest Sea Battle exhibition at the National Maritime Museum Greenwich.

    The exhibition recounts the story of the great battle and its aftermath, through both German and British perspectives. Examine all the action of a battle that involved an incredible 279 ships, and feast your eyes on photographs, paintings, ship models and items made by the sailors.

    Uncover stories that have never before been told, while marvelling at personal accounts that will teach you about what it was like to live during the First World War.

  • Nicolaes Maes: Dutch Master of the Golden Age

    The National Gallery
    Trafalgar Square, Charing Cross
    London, WC2N 5DN
    Nicolaes Maes: Dutch Master of the Golden Age

    This exhibition is the first devoted to Nicolaes Maes, a leading artist of the Dutch Golden Age and one of Rembrandt’s most important pupils.

    Featuring over 35 paintings and drawings from collections across the world, the exhibition spans Maes’s whole career, spent in Dordrecht and Amsterdam. 

    The art for which he is best known, intimate scenes of daily life, form the heart of the exhibition. These works show how Maes pioneered the theme of the eavesdropper; his carefully styled narratives often break the fourth wall, making the viewer a participant in the scene, as characters eavesdrop or point to illicit goings-on.

    The exhibition also features Maes’s early history paintings in the style of Rembrandt, alongside works from the later period of his life, when he devoted himself almost exclusively to portraits and brought a Van Dyckian elegance and swagger to the genre.

  • Driverless: Who is in control?

    Exhibition Road, South Kensington
    London, SW7 2DD
     Driverless: Who is in control?

    Technology developers are racing to create fully autonomous machines with the ability to make decisions on their own. How many of these smart machines already exist? And how much control are we willing to transfer to them?

    Discover more in this cutting-edge exhibition through interactive exhibits, thought-provoking objects and even a retro robot car. Driverless will give you a unique glimpse into the AI-driven tech that could shape the habits, behaviour and society of tomorrow. 

    Highlights include self-driving cars, autonomous flying drones and smart underwater vehicles like the Autosub Long Range Boaty McBoatface.

  • Beyond Documentary: Experimental Photography in London 1976-2006

    150 London Wall, Barbican
    London, EC2Y 5HN
    Beyond Documentary: Experimental Photography in London 1976-2006

    Since the 1970s, photographers have increasingly asked questions about the nature of the medium and the role of the photographer in the construction of the image. Women artists have been particularly active in this, as photography provides a way of working distinct from the traditionally masculine art forms of painting and sculpture.

    The photographs in this exhibition are a selection from a three-year collecting project. The museum’s aim was to acquire the work of artists who make photographs about London using experimental tactics. Their approaches involve examining social issues through carefully set-up compositions or by placing prints in a narrative sequence. Others study closely a particular locality over a sustained period of time or record it by pushing against the technical constraints of photography. All, in their different ways, have produced rich bodies of work through prolonged engagement with the city.

  • Collecting for London

    150 London Wall, Barbican
    London, EC2Y 5HN
    Collecting for London

    The museum holds some seven million items in its London Collection.

    We regularly add to our collection, acquiring items that reflect the past and present of this unique city. We do not just collect precious or beautiful objects, we are also interested in the everyday, things that at first glance might not look very special. The context and associated information of even simple objects can often tell us a lot about the history of the capital and in particular the Londoners who lived, or live, here.

    This display showcases some of the recent additions made to the collection, highlighting a very diverse range of stories.

  • Hyundai Commission

    Tate Britain
    Millbank, Westminster
    London, SW1P 4RG
    Hyundai Commission

    Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall has hosted some of the world’s most memorable and acclaimed large-scale works of art, enjoyed by audiences of millions each year. The way artists have responded to this vast, former industrial space has transformed public perceptions of contemporary art.

    The fifth installation in the ten-year series of the Hyundai Commission will give an artist an opportunity to create new site-specific work for this unique context, following the work of Abraham Cruzvillegas in 2015, Philippe Parreno in 2016, SUPERFLEX in 2017 and Tania Bruguera in 2018.

  • Space Descent VR with Tim Peake

    Exhibition Road, South Kensington
    London, SW7 2DD
     Space Descent VR with Tim Peake

    As the European Space Agency’s first British astronaut, Tim Peake spent six incredible months aboard the International Space Station.

    Now, let Tim be your guide on an out-of-this-world virtual reality mission that puts you in the pilot’s seat of a Soyuz capsule—just like the one that brought him home.

    Using the latest state-of-the-art VR technology, you’ll get a 360° look inside a Soyuz capsule and experience the thrill of being an astronaut. Space Descent VR retraces the 400km journey back to Earth from the ISS, and is narrated by Tim Peake.

  • Red Arrows 3D

    Exhibition Road, South Kensington
    London, SW7 2DD
     Red Arrows 3D

    Discover the thrill of flying with the RAF Red Arrows during one of their sensational aerobatic displays in Red Arrows 3D.

    This stunning high definition 3D film, with flight motion technology, allows you to feel for yourself what it's like in the cockpit as the 'Reds' fly in close formation and perform impressive solo manoeuvres.

    Then you can take the controls for yourself in our Fly 360° jet flight simulators.

  • Making the Modern World

    Exhibition Road, South Kensington
    London, SW7 2DD
     Making the Modern World

    Chart 250 years of science and technology and discover some of the most iconic items that have shaped our society.

    The Making the Modern World gallery presents some of the Museum’s most remarkable objects. Come face-to-face with the Apollo 10 command module, Babbage’s Difference Engine No. 1, Crick and Watson’s DNA model and the first Apple computer.

    You’ll also find thought-provoking objects such as penicillin from Fleming’s laboratory, a porcelain bowl salvaged from Hiroshima and a clock that will tell the time for the next 10,000 years.

    Visit this exceptional gallery to follow the cultural history of industrialisation from 1750 to the present day.

  • Pattern Pod

    Exhibition Road, South Kensington
    London, SW7 2DD
     Pattern Pod

    Pattern Pod is an amazing multi-sensory area for children under 8 years old.

    In Pattern Pod, children can explore water ripples without getting their feet wet, create symmetrical images on touch screens, follow robot trails and much more. Fun, interactive exhibits encourage them to recognise and copy patterns—or create entirely new ones of their own.

    Like scientists, children explore the world by trying to make predictions about events happening around them. It’s often easier to make these predictions if these events repeat themselves or if there is a pattern to them.

    There’s something for grown-ups too. Touch screens give fascinating insights into the science behind the exhibits and the ways in which children play and learn.

    Visit Pattern Pod on the ground floor of the museum—it’s a fun and stimulating place where children can learn through play to develop their science skills.

  • The Garden

    Exhibition Road, South Kensington
    London, SW7 2DD
     The Garden

    An exciting interactive space, created especially for children aged 3–6 and their parents and carers.

    Inquisitive children can explore the main areas—construction, water, light and sound. While playing, they can find out about floating and sinking, shadows and reflections, and much more. At the same time, they’ll develop the skills of observing, predicting, testing and drawing conclusions.

    Explainers are on hand to help—you can’t miss them; they all wear bright red T-shirts. They are happy to answer questions or join in the games to make sure that everyone gets the most from the gallery.

    Visit The Garden in the basement of the museum for non-stop fun. From giant tubes that carry whispers to a flying saucer that radiates white light, it’s an ideal place for 3–6-year-olds to discover science through play.

  • Discovery Motion Theatre: Legend of Apollo

    Exhibition Road, South Kensington
    London, SW7 2DD
     Discovery Motion Theatre: Legend of Apollo

    Based on the Apollo lunar landings of 1960s and 1970s, this film's exceptional 3D computer animation will fly you to the moon, where you can experience the sights and sounds of an Apollo expedition.

    Spread across two rooms, the Discovery Motion Theatre experience begins with a documentary style pre-show film. Following the documentary, collect your 3D glasses and enjoy the animated Legend of Apollo 3D film with physical special effects, which may include water, wind, flashing lights and moving seats.

  • The Secret Life of the Home

    Exhibition Road, South Kensington
    London, SW7 2DD
     The Secret Life of the Home

    From pop-up toasters to horse-drawn vacuum cleaners, take a closer look at the development of household appliances.

    Most of the objects on show date from the late 19th and the 20th century. But you’ll also find ancient Roman keys, 18th century cooking utensils and a 21st century robotic vacuum cleaner, and you’ll learn how applied robotics has become one of the key influences on the future development of household appliances.

    How do CD players, washing machines and toilets work? Interactive exhibits in the gallery will help you find out, and you can play the world’s first home video game 'Pong' too.

    Visit The Secret Life of the Home to see how the design of household gadgets has changed over time.

  • Atmosphere

    Exhibition Road, South Kensington
    London, SW7 2DD
     Atmosphere

    Step into a virtual world, with its own oceans, land and atmosphere, and go back in time to discover key moments in the Earth’s multibillion-year climate history.

    The Atmosphere gallery is an exciting place to make sense of the climate—the science of how it works, what it’s doing now and what it might do next. Uncover the secrets of ice cores and stalagmites, then head for the future to wonder at the latest ideas for a low-carbon life.

    Fascinating objects include a real Antarctic ice core, tree rings and scientists’ instruments. Come to this gallery to get to grips with the latest climate news and investigate the important issue of climate change.

    The Science Museum developed the content for this gallery through extensive research and engagement with scientists and experts, including expertise from the Met Office as principal content contributor.

  • Dóra Maurer

    Tate Britain
    Millbank, Westminster
    London, SW1P 4RG
    Dóra Maurer

    Tate Modern presents the work of Hungarian artist Dóra Maurer (born 1937) in a year-long free exhibition.

    It brings together some 35 works, revealing the diversity of her output, including graphic works, photographs, films and paintings. Spanning more than five decades, the show highlights the playful conceptual approach that she brings to her experiments across all media.

    Maurer was at the centre of an independent community of artists, poets and musicians that championed their own culture outside of the official Hungarian system during the socialist period. They organised exhibitions in apartments and published underground journals.

    Trained as a graphic artist in the 1950s, Maurer pushed the medium to its limit in her experimental works of the following two decades. In the 1970s she started to work in photography and moving image, often collaborating with musicians, as well as teaching creative performative workshops. She developed increasingly geometric and abstract drawings and paintings in the 1970s and beyond. The exhibition culminates in a room of her recent paintings, in which overlapping colours create a sense of shapes floating in space..

    Movement, displacement, perception and transformation have remained consistent threads in her work. Never tied down to one medium, Maurer remains a unique voice, constantly in motion.

    This exhibition will include works from Tate’s collection, major loans from private collections and five works which are promised gifts to Tate.

  • Maskelyne and Cooke Magic Bar

    21 Piccadilly, Mayfair
    London, W1J 0BH
    Maskelyne and Cooke Magic Bar

    Just a hop, skip and a jump away from where this bar's namesakes Maskelyne and Cooke held their famous performances, this hip, upscale bar provides magic and cocktails four nights a week. The bar itself is open for drinks from Monday through Saturday. You will be wowed and awed with close-up magic at your table, performed by top-notch local and international magicians. Fancy cocktails are on the drink menu, including one made with green absinthe. . . even the cocktails have a trick or two up their sleeves! Drop in on a Wednesday for a magic masterclass, complimentary cocktail included in price.

  • Dominick Zwolinski & Tony Middleton

    Strand
    London, WC2R 0EZ
    Dominick Zwolinski & Tony Middleton

    Spend a classy evening at a renowned hotel with two of London's best magicians. Tony Middleton of The Magic Hour (see above) and Dominick Zwolinski host a one hour and fifteen-minute parlour show. Located in a private room in the Savoy hotel, a five-star luxury hotel opened in 1889, the show is limited to 58 people and is suitable for the whole family. Just be warned that the performers are not up on a stage and if you sit in the back rows, you may have an obstructed view if you are not tall enough to see over the heads of those in front of you. The show garners great reviews, complimenting both the talent of the magicians and the fabulous location.

  • Magic Goes Wrong

    404 Strand
    London, WC2R 0NH
    Magic Goes Wrong

    Mischief Theatre collaborate with co-writers for the first time as they bring their new show Magic Goes Wrong, created with stage legends Penn and Teller, to the London stage as part of the company’s year-long residency at the Vaudeville Theatre. 

    The creators of The Play That Goes Wrong and The Comedy About A Bank Robbery have collaborated with Penn and Teller, whose successful double act has seen rise to become one of the world’s biggest magic acts selling out venues in London and the US. It is the next ‘Goes Wrong’ comedy in the West End after Peter Pan Goes Wrong and The Play That Goes Wrong.

    Magic Goes Wrong will see the original company return to star in the show, which has been written by Penn Jillette, Henry Lewis, Jonathan Sayer, Henry Shields and Teller, and it will be directed by Adam Meggido. Penn and Teller will not be appearing on stage.

  • Leopoldstadt

    32-36 Charing Cross Road
    London, WC2H 0DA
    Leopoldstadt

    A brand new Tom Stoppard play titled Leopoldstadt, which is described as 'likely his most personal play', is set to open at the Wyndham's Theatre in January 2020 directed by Patrick Marber. 

    The play is set in Vienna in1900, when 1/10 of the population were Jewish, and draws on much of Stoppard's personal family life: his four Jewish grandparents and many of his parents' family died in Nazi concentration camps. Leopoldstadt is described as a 'passionate drama of love, family and endurance' which follows a family over half a century who rediscover what it means to be Jewish. 

    It will be Stoppard's first new play in almost five years, when The Hard Problem premiered at the National Theatre. Recent productions of Stoppard's work in London include Travesties (which starred Tom Hollander at the Menier before transferring to the West End), and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead at the Old Vic (which starred Daniel Radcliffe).

  • Magic Goes Wrong

    404 Strand, Covent Garden
    London, WC2R 0NH
    Magic Goes Wrong

    Mischief Theatre conjures up another "Goes Wrong' play where just about everything that can go wrong does... all for the fun of it! Co-written with magic legends Penn and Teller, this romp through what happens when hapless magicians try to present a charity event is magically fun. Of course everything spirals out of control in the most delicious and hilarious way. Presented by the Mischief Theatre who also brought the West End "The Play that Goes Wrong". Please note, co-creators Penn and Teller will not be appearing in the show.