Event Oracle - The Oracle knows all

BEST Things To Do In Phoenix

The Event Oracle knows ALL the fun things to do in the land of the Phoenix sun. Select your date above then scroll down for all the Arts, Entertainment, and Events in my crystal ball...

  • Carnival of Illusion

    Arizona Biltmore Resort
    2400 E Missouri Ave
    Phoenix, AZ 85016
    Carnival of Illusion

    Carnival of Illusion is an evening of Old-World Magic in the style of classic entertainers such as Buster Keaton, Mae West, Gypsy Rose Lee, and Harry Houdini. The hosts have performed as house entertainers at the world's top resorts, Fortune 100 CEOs, to the 200 Most Powerful Women in America and operate the longest-running Arizona theater show. Carnival of Illusion is "Magic, Mystery, and OOOH La La."

  • Water in the Desert

    Phoenix Airport Museum Gallery
    3800 E Sky Harbor Blvd
    Phoenix, AZ 85034
    Water in the Desert

    Although Arizona is known for its dry climate, water has a profound effect on our environment. From scenic landscapes to recreational possibilities to its immense power, water can be abundant in our state.

    Many Arizonans spend their summers leisurely tubing down scenic rivers, boating on reservoirs or relaxing by the pool with friends. Monsoon rains and snowmelt from mountain regions turn arid washes into creeks and rejuvenate evaporating lakes. As water moves, it becomes a powerful force. Over time, water has carved canyons and cliffs out of solid rock. Hundreds of miles of canals transport water - making everyday life possible in our urban centers.

  • The Electric Guitar: Inventing an American Icon

    Musical Instrument Museum (MIM)
    4725 E. Mayo Blvd.
    Phoenix, AZ 85050
    The Electric Guitar: Inventing an American Icon

    The Electric Guitar: Inventing an American Icon, shares the untold story of the invention of the electric guitar, an instrument that revolutionized music and popular culture forever. This exclusive exhibition showcases more than eighty of the rarest electric guitars and amplifiers in the world?from some of the first ever heard to those played by the most famous electric guitarists known today. Decades before rock and roll, these instruments jolted, energized, and even confused the eardrums of the nation. The Electric Guitar: Inventing an American Icon encompasses the history of the electric guitar from the very beginning, including its most experimental period of the 1930s and 1940s, and gives a glimpse into the instrument’s influence on genres that defined American music.

  • Grand Procession: Contemporary Plains Indian Dolls from the Charles and Valerie Diker Collection

    Heard Museum
    2301 North Central Avenue
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    Grand Procession: Contemporary Plains Indian Dolls from the Charles and Valerie Diker Collection

    Grand Procession celebrates an exceptional collection of dolls, also known as soft sculptures, created by Jamie Okuma (Luiseño and Shoshone-Bannock), Rhonda Holy Bear (Cheyenne River Sioux and Lakota) and three generations of Growing Thunder family members; Joyce Growing Thunder, Juanita Growing Thunder Fogarty and Jessa Rae Growing Thunder (Assiniboine and Sioux). The dolls provide a figurative reference to Indigenous peoples from the Great Plains and Great Basin regions who lived in those areas during the late nineteenth century. Holy Bear, Okuma, and the three Growing Thunder family members embellish each doll with tiny micro-beads in intricate detail. The 23 dolls included in the exhibition represent the largest private collection of its kind.

  • American Indian Veterans National Memorial

    Heard Museum
    2301 North Central Avenue
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    American Indian Veterans National Memorial

    Service and sacrifice spanning more than three centuries are honored in the first and only known national memorial to American Indian veterans of many conflicts. The Memorial, located outside the Collector’s Room of the Heard Museum Shop, consists of several sizable sculptures by acclaimed Native artists Chiricahua Apache sculptor Allan Houser (1914-1994) and Michael Naranjo (Santa Clara Pueblo). The 10-foot sculpture Unconquered II is the last sculpture created by Houser. Naranjo is a Vietnam War veteran who suffered an injury that rendered him blind. Naranjo has been carving his meant-to-be-touched sculptures by feel ever since.

  • Pablita Velarde’s Studio

    Heard Museum
    2301 North Central Avenue
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    Pablita Velarde’s Studio

    One of the leading painters of the 20th century, Pablita Velarde/Tse Tsan “Golden Dawn” (Santa Clara Pueblo) (1918-2006) was a pioneer as a woman artist in an era and a community where painting was a male art form.

    Her painting began in a traditional manner but evolved through many original styles and media. She engaged in the experimentation that the best artists practice, in media or style. She cared deeply about depicting traditional lifeways that she feared would be lost and using her art to tell the stories of those lifeways. Over the decades she was an effective spokesperson discussing her art and the larger issues of the Native art world.

    This exhibit contains an accurate recreation with original objects of Pablita’s working studio, giving insight to the public of this extraordinary artist’s process.

  • It’s Your Turn – Color!

    Heard Museum
    2301 North Central Avenue
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    It’s Your Turn – Color!

    This family-friendly gallery offers a fun and educational component to our exhibition Color Riot! How Color Changed Navajo Textiles. Weavers use color, pattern, texture, and their imaginations when they make textiles. At times, the colors are so bright and the patterns are so complicated that our eyes jump when we look at them. Some of these textiles are called Eyedazzlers. Artists working in every medium use these elements of design when they create.

    In this gallery, everyone has a chance to experiment with color and pattern. Try each activity and see which one you like the best!

    Pick a color then follow your color to all of the activities!
    Make a Sheep
    Make a Match
    Weave Away
    Light and Shadow
    Make a Pattern
    Create with Color
    Color a Postcard

  • Creative Casting

    Heard Museum
    2301 North Central Avenue
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    Creative Casting

    Copper and tin come together to make bronze, a medium that offers wonderful creativity for artists in the choices of texture and patinas. Sculptor John Hoover, for example, whose earlier work was carved from cedar, found in bronze a medium that could express the qualities of his cedar carvings.

    All of the sculpture in Creative Casting came to the Heard Museum’s permanent collection through important bequests. We are honored that two knowledgeable collectors, Les Goldberg and Ann B. Ritt, chose to remember the Heard in their wills and share their collections with the public.

  • Carlos Amorales: Black Cloud

    Phoenix Art Museum
    1625 N. Central Avenue
    Phoenix, AZ 85004-1685
    Carlos Amorales: Black Cloud

    Inspired by the annual migration of monarch butterflies from Canada to Mexico, Carlos Amorales conceived of Black Cloud as a “plague” of moths that swarm through museum spaces. 25,000 black paper moths and butterflies of 30 different species seem to hover in mid-air, a surreal yet sublime gathering of insects delicately poised in sculptural formations. The artist invented this idea while visiting his grandmother. He has described it as his way of saying goodbye to her—an intensely personal origin for an artwork that inspires a universal sense of wonder in each of us. Nevertheless, the title implies an underlying sense of foreboding. These thousands of uncanny insects envelop us in an experience fluctuating between beauty and awe, the fanciful and the macabre, calm and calamity. Black Cloud exemplifies what art critics have called Amorales’ “gothic sensibility,” while also bringing the raw beauty of untamed nature into the museum.

    Carlos Amorales is one of the most celebrated Mexican artists working today. He was chosen to represent Mexico at the 2017 Venice Biennial, one of the highest international honors for an artist. He works in a wide variety of media, including video, painting, drawing, sculpture, and performance.

  • Docents Select: Zoo

    Mesa Arts Center
    One East Main Street
    Mesa, AZ 85201
    Docents Select: Zoo

    As with most museums, the Mesa Contemporary Arts (MCA) Museum Docents are central to the functionality of the museum. Through their volunteer efforts and assistance, tours are conducted, artwork is researched, special talks are prepared and opening receptions succeed. This exhibition was entirely curated by the MCA Museum Docents and demonstrates some of the research they have conducted on animal inspired works from the permanent collection.

  • Yayoi Kusama: You Who Are Getting Obliterated in the Dancing Swarm of Fireflies

    Phoenix Art Museum
    1625 N. Central Avenue
    Phoenix, AZ 85004-1685
    Yayoi Kusama: You Who Are Getting Obliterated in the Dancing Swarm of Fireflies

    Yayoi Kusama’s You Who Are Getting Obliterated in the Dancing Swarm of Fireflies is one of the artist's more whimsical works. Inspired by a Japanese folktale about a person in a field with 10,000 fireflies, Kusama's work brings the fairy tale to life. Beginning with drawings and paintings, Yayoi Kusama’s work transformed from 2-D pieces to large-scale installations, symbolic of the obsessive and massive nature of her ideas. Subsequently, Kusama’s art began to take large forms and often covers and utilizes entire rooms and spaces.

    The piece is a dark room lined with mirrors on every surface and strands of looping LED lighting suspended from the ceiling. This deceptively small room feels as if it’s a vast, infinite galaxy of lighting and allows the viewer to enter and be surrounded, or obliterated by Kusama’s fireflies. 

    Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirror Room explores the psychedelic sensations of the ‘self’ and the artist’s ongoing hallucinations that started when she was a child. In this work, Kusama’s repetitive and extensive use of polka dots, mirrors, and LED lights explores infinite repetition and encourages you to ‘obliterate’ your personality and become one with eternity. 
     
    A pioneer of perceptual experiences, Kusama expresses a complex balance between her psychological obsessions and her aesthetic control over them. In the late 1950s, she left Japan for New York City. Her work spans paintings, performances, installations, sculptures, films, fashion, and literary works. They transcended the Pop and Minimalist movements of the twentieth century and reflect the mind-altering spirituality of hippie culture.

  • True and Livin’

    Mesa Arts Center
    One East Main Street
    Mesa, AZ 85201
    True and Livin’

    Artist and Assistant Professor of Art at the University of Arizona, Aaron Coleman is renowned for his powerful, sociopolitical commentaries. Coleman examines religious ideologies, scientific research, popular culture and political policies that uphold and perpetuate myths, stereotypes and laws that relegate African, Latino and Indigenous peoples to a permanent second-class status. In this installation, Coleman uses painting, sculptures and mixed media to expose the incessant and diabolical strategies of colonialism as well as its lingering impact on American society.

  • Landmarks

    Phoenix Art Museum
    1625 N. Central Avenue
    Phoenix, AZ 85004-1685
    Landmarks


    Welcome! Whether you have traveled from near or far, you likely used a landmark to find your way here. Landmarks can be a part of nature, such as a tree or a mountain, or something human constructed. They define boundaries and may be sites of significant events in our collective or personal histories.
    The works of art in this gallery explore ways artists relate to and represent the land. From sites in national parks to things one might see in a desert or urban environment, the artists gathered here investigate different kinds of landmarks.  
    These features of the landscape help us know where we are in the world and orient us through unfamiliar territory. Over time, they might reorient or reconnect us to a place and reveal changes in the physical world and ourselves. 
    Each of us has connections to places that are important to us. What are the landmarks that define your world?
     

  • Agnes Pelton

    Phoenix Art Museum
    1625 N. Central Ave. Central Avenue and McDowell Road
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    Agnes Pelton

    Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist is the first survey on the obscure American painter in more than 24 years. A graduate of the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, she began experimenting with abstraction in the early 1900s in New York, eventually exhibiting in the Armory Show of 1913 at the invitation of Walt Kuhn. She painted conventional desert landscapes to make a living, but it was her abstract studies of earth and light, biomorphic compositions of delicate veils, shimmering stars, and atmospheric horizon lines, that distinguished her work.

     
    A believer in numerology, astrology, and faith healing, Pelton’s abstract compositions propelled her into an esoteric world epitomized by the Transcendental Painting Group (1938-1942), a short-lived group that promoted abstract, non-objective art. Although Pelton received some attention during her lifetime, she has been relatively unknown within the field of American Art. Approximately 40 – 45 works will comprise this exhibition shedding light on Pelton’s artistic contribution to American Modernism.
  • Get Charged Up

    Arizona Science Center
    600 E. Washington St.
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    Get Charged Up

    Humans are naturally curious and the science of observation helps us understand the natural world around us – how things work and why.

    Bed of Nails
    Lie down on a bed of nails. With more than 1,000 nails, each nail supports only a fraction of your weight so the nails won't hurt you.

    Giant Lever
    Learn how levers give us a mechanical advantage in this giant game of tug-of-war. It's not about how hard you pull the rope, but where.

    Pulley Power
    Go for a ride in one of our three pulley chairs.

    Color Mixing
    Experiment with a prism to split white light into its different wavelengths and combine them to form different colors.

    Electromagnetic Workbench
    Experience the invisible forces of electromagnetism as objects move before your very eyes.

    Electric Circuits
    Build your own circuit and explore the science behind basic electrical components, voltage, current, polarity and Ohm’s Law.

  • Petrichor

    Mesa Arts Center
    One East Main Street
    Mesa, AZ 85201
    Petrichor

    Born and raised in Mesa, Arizona, Esao Andrews is a Japanese-American artist and illustrator, who has gained international acclaim for his album artwork and comic book covers. Working primarily in oil on wood panel, Andrews combines Gothic grotesque, erotic and surrealist imagery. This exhibition will feature site specific murals alongside new and old works that create vicarious gateways into worlds populated by stirrings of the subconscious.

  • Flora

    Phoenix Art Museum
    1625 N. Central Avenue
    Phoenix, AZ 85004-1685
    Flora

    Discover how flowers have inspired fashions through the ages in Flora at Phoenix Art Museum. Showcasing ensembles and accessories by Marc Jacobs, Comme des Garçons, Charles James, Slava Zaitsev, and more, the upcoming exhibition explores the evolution of botanical-inspired designs from the 18th century through the present. Historical garments with embroidered and realistic floral motifs are shown alongside modern pieces featuring flower-inspired silhouettes and bold, abstract floral prints. The exhibition also showcases a variety of textiles and techniques, providing Museum guests with the opportunity to explore and learn about how designers then and now created their flora-inspired fashions.

  • Allure

    Mesa Arts Center
    One East Main Street
    Mesa, AZ 85201
    Allure

    Crystal Wagner is an internationally established interdisciplinary artist known for her site-specific installations that are recycled hybrids between manufactured and organic worlds. With chicken wire and torn colorful plastic table cloths, Wagner creates lush sculptures that are shaped into reimagined plant life in exotic environments. She is interested in exploring the dichotomy of familiarity and foreign and how they relate to nature and the human experience.

  • Forces of Nature

    Arizona Science Center
    600 E. Washington St.
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    Forces of Nature

    Immersion Theater
    What does it feel like to be in the middle of a hurricane, tornado, wildfire, volcanic eruption or monsoon? There's only one way to find out. This five-minute show happens every 15 minutes. Supported by a grant from the Freeport-McMoRan Foundation.

    Magic Planet®
    See the last six weeks of weather patterns around the planet. Explore the cloud and air patterns that create major storms around the world. Located in the Wells Fargo Classroom.

    Stardust Faces of Science
    Meet three scientists with ties to Arizona: a volcanologist, a hydrologist and a meteorologist. The scientists explain, in their own words, what they do and what their work means to the rest of the world. They also share some of the real-life tools they use in their fields of expertise.

  • My Digital World

    Arizona Science Center
    600 E. Washington St.
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    My Digital World

    Stop by and explore the world of digital communication technology without hearing the words, "If you break it, you buy it." This gallery introduces visitors to the science behind digital communications, how they work and how they are utilized to create and share ideas and information.

    The future is now and we are ready to show you how former science fiction technologies are becoming a part of your everyday life. Explore the gadgets that enable us to share messages, ideas, music and images whenever we want at the touch of a button.

    Stop by and learn about these innovations in a very real way that connects you to "Your" Digital World.

    Virtual Sand
    Discover how the digital world and physics intermingle with Virtual Sand. Use your whole body to interact with dynamic media to learn and play with digital sand!

    Warp Your Image
    Twist and bend your face with Warp Your Image, using pixels to create digital art! Coordinate with buttons to explore just how pixels can alter your world!

    Harkins Ham Shack
    When all forms of communications have failed the Harkins Ham Shack is where you'll want to be. Learn how to use the most reliable line of communication with the radio experts at the Ham Shack. Want to learn more about Ham radios?

  • Fragments: Broken Bowls Tell More Tales

    Pueblo Grande Museum and Archaeological Park
    4619 E. Washington St.
    Phoenix, AZ 85034
    Fragments: Broken Bowls Tell More Tales

    Hear the stories pottery sherds have to tell archaeologists when theses pieces of the past are rediscovered and studied. FragmentsBroken Bowls Tell More Tales, is a temporary exhibit at Pueblo Grande Museum that explores researchers use sherds to uncover a variety of details, such as how the pottery was made, used, and where it was produced. These details aren’t always obvious during examinations of gorgeous whole pottery vessels.

    Visitors typically see the most unique and complete pottery vessels of a museums’ collection on display. They seldom see, or know about, the thousands of broken pottery fragments called ‘sherds’ that are preserved in storage. Using local and traded examples, Fragments invites visitors to see how sherds help archaeologists piece together new ideas about the ancestral O'Odham, more commonly known as the Hohokam.  The exhibition also features sherds that connect the Hohokam with their neighbors across the Southwest and northern Mexico during the time of the European Renaissance. Visitors can listen to local Native perspectives on archaeology and cultural preservation while experiencing traditional O’odham songs that tell of the mountains surrounding Pueblo Grande and their deep connections to past, present, and future O’odham generations.

  • Solarville

    Arizona Science Center
    600 E. Washington St.
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    Solarville

    Step off the elevator and board the Solar Light Rail Station to begin your journey. Once in Solarville, you will stroll through scientific labs that study the sun and how to harness and distribute sustainable green energy – from algae, alternative fuels and poop.

    Lend a hand in developing wind engine turbines and inventing new garbage waste systems. Also learn about cutting-edge technologies being implemented to address sustainable energy in businesses and cities around the world.

    Explore ways you can utilize solar and renewable energy in your everyday life, from home appliances to harnessing the power of the changing seasons.

  • Oblique Views: Southwest Aerial Landscapes by Charles and Anne Lindbergh and Adriel Heisey

    Chandler Museum
    300 S. Chandler Village Drive
    Chandler, AZ 85226
    Oblique Views: Southwest Aerial Landscapes by Charles and Anne Lindbergh and Adriel Heisey

    The exhibit pairs then and now photos of the Southwest to show changes in the land over time. In 2008 Adriel Heisey rephotographed the same vantage points from his plane that Charles Lindbergh and his wife Anne captured in 1929.

  • Selections from the Schorr Collection

    Phoenix Art Museum
    1625 N. Central Avenue
    Phoenix, AZ 85004-1685
    Selections from the Schorr Collection


    David and Hannah Lewis have spent four decades carefully and painstakingly amassing one of the most important collections of Old Master and 19th-century paintings in the world, and one of the largest private collections in the United Kingdom. With their first purchase in 1967, the Lewises were not art experts, first beginning their collection for the sole purpose of finding art to hang on the walls of their new home in North London. What would transpire would become a passion that would consume their lives for decades to come, and forever transform the galleries of museums all over the world. 

    Today, the Schorr Collection, named for the family of Hannah Lewis, numbers more than 500 works, ranging from tender 15th-century devotional images through to 19th-century French impressionist landscapes and 20th-century Modern Masters. Rather than sequester the treasures of their collection away in private galleries, the Lewis family shares works from the Schorr Collection, one of the largest private collections in the United Kingdom, with public museums on a long-term basis.

    A recipient of long-term loans from the Schorr Collection in 2013, Phoenix Art Museum will now welcome an additional 30 paintings. This significant group will include a full-length 17-century portrait by Anthony van Dyck from his Genoa period and the great Death of Seneca (c. 1625), by Gerrit van Honthorst.

  • Mummies of the World: The Exhibition

    Arizona Science Center
    600 E. Washington St.
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    Mummies of the World: The Exhibition

    Mummies of the World: The Exhibition features 40 real human and animal mummies and 85 rare artifacts from across the globe. This blockbuster exhibition, arriving in Phoenix straight from Budapest, Hungary, provides a window into the lives of ancient people from every region of the world including Europe, South America and Ancient Egypt, offering unprecedented insights into past cultures and civilizations.

    The exhibition will enthrall guests with dramatic displays of the mummies and their personal stories, as well as state-of-the-art multimedia stations that will take guests on a 4,500-year journey to explore the mummies’ history and origins as well as how they were created.

  • Silk and Jade: Chinese Aristocratic Treasures

    Phoenix Art Museum
    1625 N. Central Avenue
    Phoenix, AZ 85004-1685
    Silk and Jade: Chinese Aristocratic Treasures


    Silk was first developed in ancient China. The earliest example of silk has been found in tombs at a Neolithic site and dates back 8,500 years. Legend gives credit for developing silk to a Chinese empress. Silks were originally reserved for the emperors of China for their own use and gifts to others, but spread gradually through trade both geographically and socially to many regions of Asia and the rest of the world. Because of its texture and luster, silk rapidly became a popular luxury fabric in the many areas accessible to Chinese merchants.  In addition to being used to make clothes and other textiles, silk was also used for traditional paintings.
     
    Jade refers to an ornamental mineral, mostly known for its green varieties.   It can refer to either of two different minerals: nephrite, a silicate of calcium and magnesium, or jadeite, a silicate of sodium and aluminium.  Nephrite jade has been mined and worked in China since Neolithic times.  Jade was used to create many utilitarian and ceremonial objects, from indoor decorative items to jade burial suits.  “Anciently superior men found the likeness of all excellent qualities in jade.  Soft, smooth, glossy, it appeared to them like benevolence; fine, compact, and strong, like intelligence; angular but not sharp and cutting, like righteousness; its flaws not concealing its beauty, nor its beauty concealing its flaws, like loyalty.” In these words the sage Confucius captured how the Chinese have felt about jade for thousands of years.
     

  • Gaman: Enduring Japanese American Internment at Gila River

    Chandler Museum
    300 S Chandler Village Dr
    Chandler, AZ 85226
    Gaman: Enduring Japanese American Internment at Gila River

    During World War II over 16,000 Japanese Americans were forcibly removed from the west coast to Gila River Internment Camp, near Chandler, simply because they looked like the enemy. This poignant exhibit demonstrates how the Japanese value gaman, enduring the seemingly impossible with patience and dignity, guided these American citizens, through loss and incarceration in the Arizona desert.  See the photos, hear the stories, read the names of incarcerees, and view the community contributed paper cranes in this transformative exhibition. 

  • Julio César Morales: Invaders

    Phoenix Art Museum
    1625 N. Central Avenue
    Phoenix, AZ 85004-1685
    Julio César Morales: Invaders

    Through July 7, 2019, Julio César Morales: Invaders and the 2018 Phoenix Art Museum Artists’ Grants Recipients Exhibition showcase various works by the recipients of the 2018 Arlene and Morton Scult Artist Award and the Phoenix Art Museum Artists’ Grants.

    The Arlene and Morton Scult Artist Award recognizes a mid-career Arizona artist who has demonstrated a sustained commitment to their chosen medium, continuous artistic growth, and consistent artistic production, while the Artists’ Grants encourage emerging contemporary artists in Arizona.

  • Cartomancy – The Seni Horoscopes

    Mesa Arts Center
    One East Main Street
    Mesa, AZ 85201
    Cartomancy – The Seni Horoscopes

    Shay Bredimus, who grew up in Phoenix, is a nationally celebrated tattoo and visual artist known for his signature technique of incorporating tattoo ink and wax crayon on drafting film. Bredimus’ Seni Horoscopes are comprised of 72 unique works based on the 17th century German fortune telling card system by Italian oracle Giovanni Battista Seni. The cards reference and reimagine the iconic and mystical symbols through a mixture of pictographs and portraits.

  • American Scenes

    Phoenix Art Museum
    1625 N. Central Avenue
    Phoenix, AZ 85004-1685
    American Scenes

    American Scenes/Americas Seen features works spanning the 1930s and 1940s by celebrated muralists and abstract artists including Diego Rivera, Alfredo Ramos Martinez, Carlos Mérida, Alice Trumbull Mason, Doris Rosenthal, and others.

    During the thirties and forties, many artists reacted against the abstract styles favored by the first generation of American moderns, dismissing non-objective art as “un-American.” Favoring representational modes, artists on both sides of the border pursued variations on several period styles variously called in the United States as the American Scene, Regionalism, and Social Realism.

    In Mexico, the Mural Movement shaped by the utopian fervor of the Revolution was initially a state-sponsored project to bring public art to the masses, translating nationalist ideologies into visual form. Some celebrated muralists like Diego Rivera also created easel paintings of idealized peasants marketed to foreign tourists, and Alfredo Ramos Martinez’s heroic paintings of indigenous peoples were in great demand during his sojourn in California in the late thirties.

  • Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist

    Phoenix Art Museum
    1625 N. Central Avenue
    Phoenix, AZ 85004-1685
    Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist

    Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist is the first exhibition on the little-known American painter in more than 24 years. Born to American parents in Stuttgart, Germany, Agnes Pelton (1881-1961) and her family briefly lived in Basel, Switzerland before returning to the United States in 1888.

    A graduate of the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, she began experimenting with abstraction in the early 1900s in New York, eventually exhibiting in the Armory Show of 1913 at the invitation of Walt Kuhn.

  • I Have a Name

    Arizona Heritage Center at Papago Park
    1300 N. College Avenue
    Tempe, AZ 85281
    I Have a Name

    “I Have a Name” features a collection of black and white photographs of the people on the street by Jon Linton. Through this dramatic collection, Linton puts names to the faces of the people who live in and around our communities, who have no home to call their own. This exhibition will be accompanied by extensive programming exploring the many facets of the homeless population, from the demographics of the homeless, to their impact on communities, to the service organizations who serve them. Don’t miss this riveting exhibition and programs.

  • A Place for All People

    Arizona Heritage Center at Papago Park
    1300 N. College Avenue
    Tempe, AZ 85281
    A Place for All People

    This exhibition explores the African American experience, evoking the power of oration and freedom stories, the brilliance of artistic achievement, and the soaring heights of cultural expression, philosophy, sports, and politics through a series of posters from the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of African American History and Culture. The posters serve as the backdrop for displays telling the story of African Americans in Arizona. From the churches and schools to the boardroom; to the battlefields and to the neighborhood barbershops and beauty shops where important news of the day was discussed – the stories weave a rich tapestry of African American heritage.

  • Metzilocan: Claudia Peña Salinas

    ASU Art Museum
    51 E. 10th St.,
    Tempe, AZ 85281
    Metzilocan: Claudia Peña Salinas

    “Metzilocan” is an installation-based solo exhibition by artist Claudia Peña Salinas, who lives and works in New York City. The exhibition expands the artist’s research on the Aztec deities of water, Tláloc and Chalchiuhtlicue, relating this ancestral symbolism and knowledge to modernist and contemporary structures. Through travel, documentation and collection, Salinas generates a poetic personal and political narrative. The works in this exhibition address topics ranging from the proliferation of images, the myth and the construction of national identity, to gender issues and the current water crisis in Mexico City.

  • The Dixie Swim Club

    Scottsdale Desert Stages Theatre
    7014 East Camelback Road,
    Scottsdale, AZ 85251
    The Dixie Swim Club

    Five Southern women, whose friendships began many years ago on their college swim team, set aside a long weekend every August to recharge those relationships. Free from husbands, kids and jobs, they meet at the same beach cottage on North Carolina’s Outer Banks to catch up, laugh and meddle in each other’s lives.

    Dixie Swim Club is presented by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc., New York.

  • Million Dollar Quartet

    Phoenix Theatre
    1825 N Central Ave
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    Million Dollar Quartet

    Relive the now-legendary 1956 impromptu jam session of Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis. Featuring a score of your favorite rock hits including “Blue Suede Shoes,” “Great Balls of Fire,” “Walk the Line,” and “Hound Dog,” Million Dollar Quartet is a scorching show packed with red-hot talent.

  • Spamilton: An American Parody

    The Phoenix Theatre Company
    1825 N. Central Ave.
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    Spamilton: An American Parody

    Don’t miss this “convulsively funny” (NY Times) parody from the comic mastermind behind the long-running hit Forbidden Broadway.  After tearing it up in New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, Spamilton: An American Parody will stage a singing, dancing, comedy revolution in Phoenix for a limited time only. The Huffington Post raves “you don’t have to see Hamilton to have side-splitting fun at Spamilton.”

Have FUN with us! Carnival Of Illusion