Event Oracle - The Oracle knows all

BEST Things To Do In Phoenix

The Event Oracle knows ALL the fun things to do in the land of the Phoenix sun. Select your date above then scroll down for all the Arts, Entertainment, and Events in my crystal ball...

  • Carnival of Illusion

    Arizona Biltmore Resort
    2400 E Missouri Ave
    Phoenix, AZ 85016
    Carnival of Illusion

    Carnival of Illusion is an evening of Old-World Magic in the style of classic entertainers such as Buster Keaton, Mae West, Gypsy Rose Lee, and Harry Houdini. The hosts have performed as house entertainers at the world's top resorts, Fortune 100 CEOs, to the 200 Most Powerful Women in America and operate the longest-running Arizona theater show. Carnival of Illusion is "Magic, Mystery, and OOOH La La."

  • Cranes, Trains and Airplanes: Constructing Sky Harbor

    Phoenix Airport Museum Gallery
    3800 E Sky Harbor Blvd
    Phoenix, AZ 85034
    Cranes, Trains and Airplanes: Constructing Sky Harbor

    It all began with a farm field and a dirt runway in 1928. No one could have imagined the tremendous growth that would come to Phoenix, and as a result to the airport. In fact, City planners thought the state-of-the-art Terminal 2 that opened in 1962 would be sufficient for airline traffic until the year 2000. However, Terminal 3 was built in 1979, and a little over a decade later, Terminal 4. Through the years, Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport continued expanding, improving and keeping pace with travel demand. It even became one of the busiest airports in the nation. 

    This exhibition captures Sky Harbor’s development with images of its design and construction throughout the past 90 years. Creating airport control towers, terminals and the PHX Sky Train® are major undertakings. Their immensity is matched by a multitude of people that help materialize ideas, from architects, engineers and designers to builders, installers and fabricators.

  • Shaping Sound The Art of Guitar Making

    Phoenix Airport Museum Gallery
    3800 E Sky Harbor Blvd
    Phoenix, AZ 85034
    Shaping Sound The Art of Guitar Making

    In our fast-paced, technological world of seemingly endless mass production, there are still some who desire to create with their hands. This is especially true for guitar players who design, build and repair their own instruments. The art of guitar-making, or Luthiery,allows skilled craftsman to turn raw materials into unique instruments.

    The Roberto-Venn School of Luthiery, based in the heart of Phoenix, has supported aspiring guitar builders for over four decades. Students from around the globe come to attend North America’s oldest and only accredited guitar-making school. At Roberto-Venn, people that are passionate about music can learn the old-world craft of creating a guitar by hand.

    From selecting wood to finishing techniques, students learn every aspect of guitar construction. They discover how the design and assembly of each element affects how the guitar will play as well as the instruments visual aesthetic and artistry. By merging tradition with innovation and creativity, students at Roberto-Venn are shaping sound.

  • 100 Years, 100 Ranchers, Photographs by Scott Baxter

    Phoenix Airport Museum Gallery
    3800 E Sky Harbor Blvd
    Phoenix, AZ 85034
    100 Years, 100 Ranchers, Photographs by Scott Baxter

    Wide open landscapes dotted with grazing cattle and sheep herded by the rancher on horseback have become an iconic symbol of our western culture. For more than 100 years the ranching tradition has been an integral part of Arizona’s history and growth. In celebration of Arizona’s Centennial in 2012, Scott Baxter photographed 100 Arizona ranchers whose families have been ranching for a century or more.

    For more than 10 years Baxter has been traveling to ranches across the state, getting to know the individual ranchers and their operations. He chose to use large-format cameras, a traditional process which takes time and allowed him to engage his subjects in a personal manner. Using black and white film Baxter captures a sense of timelessness and directs the viewer’s full attention to the subject in the frame.

    The strength and independent nature of this unique group of Arizonans is apparent in their portraits. Baxter’s collection of photographs is a tribute to Arizona’s ranching legacy by preserving an important piece of Arizona character and history.

  • Water in the Desert: Photography

    Phoenix Airport Museum Gallery
    3800 E Sky Harbor Blvd
    Phoenix, AZ 85034
    Water in the Desert: Photography

    Water in the Desert: Photography exhibition showcases photographs from 10 Arizona artists, who capture a wide range of images - from snow on saguaros to an urban hydroelectric plant.

    From the Colorado River to Glen Canyon Dam, artists consider where Arizona’s water comes from and how we use it. Some artists find inspiration in the calming and reflective quality of water’s surface, while others use water as an art material. From its aesthetic quality to conservation, this exhibition reflects various artistic interpretations of water in the desert.

  • Intimate and Expansive Ceramic art by Tiffany C. Bailey

    Phoenix Airport Museum Gallery
    3800 E Sky Harbor Blvd
    Phoenix, AZ 85034
    Intimate and Expansive Ceramic art by Tiffany C. Bailey

    Steep bluffs, fields of corn and herds of cows are some of the picturesque features ceramic artist Tiffany C. Bailey remembers about her hometown. Growing up in Southwestern Wisconsin, Bailey was raised in a rural community with an abundance of pastures, farmland and a population of only 300 people.

    After moving to Arizona to continue her ceramic studies, she revisited her memories of the architecture and topography near her childhood home. Now, in her artistic practice, she distills those elements into small-scale artworks to interpret a landscape that is both intimate and expansive.

    Bailey uses a slip-cast method to make her ceramic artwork. The process begins with a model that is either hand-sculpted or is a found object. From the model, a plaster mold is produced. Porcelain slip (liquefied clay) is poured into the mold, dried and then fired in a kiln. The plaster mold can be used repeatedly to replicate the form creating artworks in series. She embellishes the art object with ceramic stains, underglazes or graphite drawings, resulting in one-of-a-kind pieces. 

  • A Land North: Works from the Heard Museum Collection

    Heard Museum
    2301 North Central Avenue
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    A Land North: Works from the Heard Museum Collection

    This exhibition is a presentation of pieces from the Heard Museum’s permanent holdings of Indigenous Alaskan and Canadian First Nations art. A Land North celebrates the complexities of these cultures and highlights the diverse representation of artworks in the Heard Collection. Featuring more than 100 years of objects, starting at 1900, the exhibition spotlights pieces in mediums including works on paper, textiles, basketry, scrimshaw engraving, jewelry, and sculpture. Many of the works, such as the ivory engravings created by Angokwazhuk (Happy Jack) and baleen basketry by Robert James and Carl Taalak, were produced specifically for tourist consumption, whereas the textiles of Victoria Mamnguqsualuk and the prints of Simon Tookoome were produced as narrative devices.

    Themes explored by the artists include notions of shamanism and the interconnectedness of the metaphysical and the land, illuminating transformation, and spiritual practices. Other works depict daily life and the flora and fauna of Alaska and Canada. Each of these works elucidates the cultural continuum of Indigenous peoples in these territories.

  • Around the World: The Heard Museum Collection

    Heard Museum
    2301 North Central Avenue
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    Around the World: The Heard Museum Collection

    Dwight and Maie Bartlett Heard were world travelers, and they collected art made in the countries they visited. In 1892, Maie Bartlett’s family and her fiancé Dwight Heard traveled to Egypt voyaging up the Nile as far as Aswan with one of Thomas Cook’s tours. The Heards moved to Phoenix from Chicago in 1895 and, while they collected from the Southwest, they continued to collect art from around the world.

    A trip to Hawai’i in 1924 was followed in the winter of 1925 with a second trip to Egypt and the Sudan. In the 1920s as the collections filled their home, named Casa Blanca, they decided to place the collection in a museum to be built on their property. Their vision of a public collection was realized with the opening of the Heard Museum on December 26, 1929. The museum’s upstairs galleries presented cultural arts from Around the World.

    In 2006, more than 75 years after its grand opening, the Heard Museum opened a new exhibition to honor that first exhibition and to share with the public how the collections have grown through the generosity of donors and individual artists who have given work to the museum.

    Around the World: The Heard Museum Collection includes items from the Heards’ world travels as well as important works from later donors like Byron Harvey III. Many of the pieces in this exhibition reveal the global-reach of the Heard as an important nexus for preserving indigenous art and culture. Visitors can view rarely displayed works by indigenous peoples of Canada and Mexico, as well as Guatemala, the Philippine Islands, New Zealand, Zaire and Sudan—From exquisite cradleboards from Plains Indian cultures to Guatemalan paintings and masks from Africa.

  • The Third Dimension: Sculptural Stories in Stone and Bronze

    Heard Museum
    2301 North Central Avenue
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    The Third Dimension: Sculptural Stories in Stone and Bronze

    Some of the most exciting and moving American Indian fine art of the 20th and 21st centuries has been created by sculptors. The Heard Museum is fortunate recently to have been given works by leading American Indian sculptors such as Allan Houser and John Hoover Gifts also include sculpture by the next generation of accomplished sculptors inspired by these pioneers, such as Doug Hyde and Bob Haozous, Houser’s son. These will be shown in The Third Dimension: Sculptural Stories in Stone and Bronze.

    The majority of the sculptures come from the estate of Ann B. Ritt, who collected sculpture by Houser (Chiricahua Apache) and Hoover, an Unangan (Aleut) artist. Both artists valued stories, honoring their telling and the inspiration that stories gave to their art.

    Doug Hyde (Nez Perce/Assiniboine/Chippewa) was a student of Houser’s at IAIA, and a major work by Hyde was donated to the Heard by Phoenix Gateway Center. “The Vigil: Mountains, Valleys, Mesas” is a three-part limestone sculpture created in 1988. Commenting on the work, the artist said that it “celebrates Southwest Native people, their hard work and culture that has survived many challenges.”

    Although some of the sculpture was donated in 2011, the Heard was not able to show some of the Hoover and Houser pieces because they needed conservation. The gift of funds from Bank of America’s Art Conservation Project has made it possible to perform this essential conservation work and now to display these three-dimensional stories in all their beauty.

  • The W.O.N.D.E.R. Center

    Arizona Science Center
    600 E. Washington St.
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    The W.O.N.D.E.R. Center

    An exploration of the original supercomputer – the human brain – The W.O.N.D.E.R. Center is one of our permanent galleries. If you've ever wondered about the brain, here's your chance to examine its anatomy, neuroscience, development, and thought.

    • Examine our touchable brain model. It simulates the size, weight and texture of a real brain!
    • Compare different types of animal brains and see a human brain in the Brain Museum.
  • Evans Family SkyCycle Page

    Arizona Science Center
    600 E. Washington St.
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    Evans Family SkyCycle Page

    Suspended nearly 15 feet in the air, the Evans Family SkyCycle teaches riders about the principles of counterbalance and center of gravity, while taking a ride on the 90-foot cable.

  • Early American Modernism: The Decade of the Armory Show

    Phoenix Art Museum
    1625 N. Central Avenue
    Phoenix, AZ 85004-1685
    Early American Modernism: The Decade of the Armory Show

    Early American Modernism: The Decade of the Armory Show features works spanning the first decades of the twentieth century by American artists experimenting with modernism, including Georgia O'Keeffe, Konrad Cramer,  Arthur Bowen Davies, Stuart Davis, Marsden Hartley, Marguerite and William Zorach, Alice Trumbull Mason, and others.

    American art underwent radical changes in the first decades of the twentieth century. The romantic urban realists, popularly known as “The Ashcan School” embodied a major shift in subject matter. More radical were those embracing European modernism who represented a revolution in style, with parallel cultural developments in literature, music, and theatre. The New Woman and the suffragists signaled substantial social shifts as well.

  • Philip Curtis and the Landscapes of Arizona

    Phoenix Art Museum
    1625 N. Central Avenue
    Phoenix, AZ 85004-1685
    Philip Curtis and the Landscapes of Arizona

    Landscape remains one of the most popular subjects for artists visiting and residing in Arizona. Philip C. Curtis, while not known as a landscape painter, draws extensively on that subject. Curtis came to the state in 1937 to establish the Phoenix Federal Art Center under the Federal Art Project, a New Deal program. He left two years later to head a similar facility in Des Moines, Iowa, but returned to Arizona in 1947. Settling in Scottsdale, he painted surreal compositions, with figures in Victorian costumes set in the desert. Arizona’s landscapes were a rich source of inspiration for him, and while his canvases do not portray any recognizable geological features, his work may be contextualized within the work of a broad spectrum of artists who came to the state. Curtis saw the desert through a lens of magic realism. This differed from Maxfield Parrish, Eugene Berman, and other artists who preferred more representational modes.

  • Point of View at Wonderspaces

    Scottsdale Fashion Square
    7014 E Camelback Rd
    Scottsdale, AZ 85251
    Point of View at Wonderspaces

    “Point of View” presented by Wonderspaces is a roughly 80-minute experience featuring artwork from 13 artists from around the world. The artwork presents visitors with experiential installations including a virtual reality dinner party and an installation that encourages digital painting through body movement.

  • Sublime Landscapes

    Phoenix Art Museum
    1625 N. Central Avenue
    Phoenix, AZ 85004-1685
    Sublime Landscapes

    Spurred by the artists from the North East who comprised the Hudson River School, landscape painting was one of the most popular subjects in nineteenth-century America. Pushed ever westward by expansionist notions of Manifest Destiny, a belief that such territorial expansion was inevitable and pre-ordained. Painters were also part of government initiatives to survey the vast region, particularly in regards to potential railroad routes and to learn about the indigenous populations they encountered. 
     
    Adventurous artists sought landscape subjects beyond the continental United States, some traveling to the Arctic, where they found immense icebergs and the Aurora Borealis (these were dangerous journeys). Artists visited equatorial South America where they thrilled to the sublime vistas and smoldering volcanos they discovered. The Amazon and the Andes were rich sources for exotic paintings. Many regarded South America as “a land of scientific wonders, golden riches, and edenic innocence.” J.P. Reichardt’s Latin American Scene of 1866 captures the attraction of humid locales very different from North America.
     

  • Fragments: Broken Bowls Tell More Tales

    Pueblo Grande Museum and Archaeological Park
    4619 E. Washington St.
    Phoenix, AZ 85034
    Fragments: Broken Bowls Tell More Tales

    Hear the stories pottery sherds have to tell archaeologists when theses pieces of the past are rediscovered and studied. FragmentsBroken Bowls Tell More Tales, is a temporary exhibit at Pueblo Grande Museum that explores researchers use sherds to uncover a variety of details, such as how the pottery was made, used, and where it was produced. These details aren’t always obvious during examinations of gorgeous whole pottery vessels.

    Visitors typically see the most unique and complete pottery vessels of a museums’ collection on display. They seldom see, or know about, the thousands of broken pottery fragments called ‘sherds’ that are preserved in storage. Using local and traded examples, Fragments invites visitors to see how sherds help archaeologists piece together new ideas about the ancestral O'Odham, more commonly known as the Hohokam.  The exhibition also features sherds that connect the Hohokam with their neighbors across the Southwest and northern Mexico during the time of the European Renaissance. Visitors can listen to local Native perspectives on archaeology and cultural preservation while experiencing traditional O’odham songs that tell of the mountains surrounding Pueblo Grande and their deep connections to past, present, and future O’odham generations.

  • All About Me

    Arizona Science Center
    600 E. Washington St.
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    All About Me

    Get ready to:

    • Walk through an enormous "working" stomach, complete with the sights, sounds and smells of the digestive process
    • Watch surgeries being performed, featuring the techniques of Dr. Edward B. Diethrich, in the Heart Surgery Theater
    • Test your heart muscles in our Wheelchair Racers
    • Explore the systems of the human bodyfrom defense and immunity to cardio and pulmonary, digestive and skeletal
    • Hear your actual heartbeat as it is translated into sound on a bass drum

    Plus, plan to attend exciting, live science demonstrations in the Daniel Cracchiolo Theater. This stage comes to life daily with scientific demonstrations. From eyeballs to explosions, each demonstration incorporates audience volunteers to roll up their sleeves as they question everything.

  • Flight Zone

    Arizona Science Center
    600 E. Washington St.
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    Flight Zone

    An extension of The Kemper and Ethel Marley Gallery, guests experience where the science of flight comes together with Arizona's flight history, providing a unique and engaging experience.

     
    Become an engineer as you imagine, plan, create and improve helicopter and airplane designs. Climb into the fuselage of an actual airplane and venture into the field of aeronautics as you explore the forces and principles of flight through several exciting hands-on exhibits.
     
    • Paper Airplane Launcher
    • Paper Helicopter Lift Activity
    • Pitch-Roll-Yaw Interactives
    • Apache Helicopter Model from Boeing and an Interactive Touch Screen
    • Arizona Flight Caps and Patches
    • Historic Flight Jacket and Flight Images
  • Making Sense of your Dollar and Cents

    Arizona Science Center
    600 E. Washington St.
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    Making Sense of your Dollar and Cents

    Presented by JPMorgan Chase & Co., Making Sense of Your Dollars and Cents is designed to introduce children and adults to important components of financial literacy – including budgeting, the importance of savings, managing accounts as well as math – in a fun, playful and engaging manner.

  • Color in Play

    Shemer Art Center
    5005 E Camelback Rd
    Phoenix, AZ 85018
    Color in Play

    A juried exhibition that features outdoor sculptures combining color and whimsy with a touch of sophistication!

  • Change Agent: June Wayne and the Tamarind Workshop

    Asu Art Museum
    SE Corner of Mill Avenue and 10th Street
    51 E. 10th St.
    51 E. 10th St.
    Tempe, AZ 85281
    Change Agent: June Wayne and the Tamarind Workshop

    “Change Agent” highlights June Wayne’s legacy as an artist, printmaker, educator and activist. Wayne refused to follow a signature style, taking on a variety of themes such as personal history, modern science and social issues. In the Dorothy Series, she narrates the life of her mother, a Russian Jewish immigrant and traveling saleswoman for a garter company. In the Stellar Winds and Solar Flares Series, she mines natural phenomena as metaphors for the human condition.

    Wayne was a catalyst for the revival of fine art lithography in the United States, a medium which had all but vanished by the 1950s. She championed lithography as an art form as vital as painting after studying the technique in Paris with the printer Marcel Durassier.  With a grant from the Ford Foundation, Wayne founded the Tamarind Lithography Workshop in Los Angeles in 1960. The experimental workshop created a pool of printers and apprentices, as artists from across the country were invited to master the process of lithography. Now known as the Tamarind Institute of the University of New Mexico, it continues Wayne’s visionary plan as a major training center for fine art printers. 

  • Clayblazers: Women Artists of the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s

    Asu Art Museum
    SE Corner of Mill Avenue and 10th Street
    51 E. 10th St.
    51 E. 10th St.
    Tempe, AZ 85281
    Clayblazers: Women Artists of the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s

    With close to 100 artworks, “Clayblazers” celebrates women in the ceramic field during the mid-20th century. Legendary artists like Maija Grotell, Susan Peterson and Marguerite Wildenhain were educators, mentors and masters of their craft and inspired future generations. All of the works in the exhibition are drawn from the ASU Art Museum’s ceramics collection of 3,800 objects, representing the full range of technique, aesthetic approaches and possibilities within the field. The exhibition also includes photographs and materials from the ASU Art Museum Ceramics Research Center’s Susan Harnly Peterson and Studio Potter archives.

  • Particle and Wave: PaperClay Illuminated

    Asu Art Museum
    SE Corner of Mill Avenue and 10th Street
    51 E. 10th St.
    51 E. 10th St.
    Tempe, AZ 85281
    Particle and Wave: PaperClay Illuminated

    "Particle and Wave" is a groundbreaking exhibition of 45 works created by international artists who incorporate paper pulp and organic fibers into their clay bodies, with the result of increased strength and lighter weight. The exhibition showcases a wide range of visual forms, which would not be possible with traditional methods, as the artists utilize this technique to express contemporary social and cultural ideas.

  • The Addams Family

    Arizona Broadway Theatre
    7701 W. Paradise Lane
    Peoria, AZ 85382
    The Addams Family

    When You’re an Addams!

    It’s the ultimate nightmare:  daughter Wednesday, the ultimate Princess of Darkness, has grown up and fallen in love…with a sweet young man from a respectable family! While her parents wonder Where Did We Go Wrong, all Wednesday wants is One Normal Night – but everything is about to change as they host a dinner for her fiancé and his parents. Whether seasoned with “salt, pepper, or cyanide,” this is one family dinner you won’t forget!

  • Million Dollar Quartet

    Phoenix Theatre
    1825 N Central Ave
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    Million Dollar Quartet

    Relive the now-legendary 1956 impromptu jam session of Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis. Featuring a score of your favorite rock hits including “Blue Suede Shoes,” “Great Balls of Fire,” “Walk the Line,” and “Hound Dog,” Million Dollar Quartet is a scorching show packed with red-hot talent.

  • Spamilton: An American Parody

    The Phoenix Theatre Company
    1825 N. Central Ave.
    Phoenix, AZ 85004
    Spamilton: An American Parody

    Don’t miss this “convulsively funny” (NY Times) parody from the comic mastermind behind the long-running hit Forbidden Broadway.  After tearing it up in New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, Spamilton: An American Parody will stage a singing, dancing, comedy revolution in Phoenix for a limited time only. The Huffington Post raves “you don’t have to see Hamilton to have side-splitting fun at Spamilton.”

Have FUN with us! Carnival Of Illusion