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BEST Things To Do In Tucson

The Event Oracle knows ALL the fun things to do in the land of the Tucson sun. Select your date above then scroll down for all the Arts, Entertainment, and Events in my crystal ball...

  • Carnival of Illusion

    Scottish Rite Grand Parlour
    160 S Scott Ave.
    Tucson, AZ 85701
    Carnival of Illusion

    Carnival of Illusion is an evening of Old-World Magic in the style of classic entertainers such as Buster Keaton, Mae West, Gypsy Rose Lee, and Harry Houdini. The hosts have performed as house entertainers at the world's top resorts, Fortune 100 CEOs, to the 200 Most Powerful Women in America and operate the longest-running Arizona theater show. Carnival of Illusion is “Magic, Mystery, and OOOH La La.”

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  • The Retablo of Ciudad Rodrigo

    University of Arizona Art Museum
    University of Arizona, 1031 Olive Rd.
    Tucson, AZ 85721
    The Retablo of Ciudad Rodrigo

    The Altarpiece of Ciudad Rodrigo is a jewel of the University of Arizona Museum of Art's collection and one of the most important works produced in 15th-century Spain. This altarpiece, also called a retablo, was made for the cathedral of the city (Ciudad) Rodrigo in the province of Salamanca, Spain, between the years 1480 and 1488, and after 1493. This exhibit is on permanent display, Tuesday-Sunday, at the University of Arizona Museum of Art.

  • Woven Through Time: American Treasures of Native Basketry & Fiber Art

    1013 E. University Boulevard
    Tucson, AZ 85721
    Woven Through Time: American Treasures of Native Basketry & Fiber Art

    Arizona State Museum's new permanent exhibit features a sampling of the more than 35,000 specimens of basketry and other fiber art in the museum's extensive collection, ranging from millennia-old objects to modern-day masterpieces that celebrate the Southwestern U.S. region's ancient and abiding fiber-weaving traditions. ASM’s total assemblage of basketry and fiber art specimens dating back some 8,000 years represents the major indigenous basket-making cultures from across North America. The museum's unparalleled collection of basketry and pottery has been designated an American Treasure by the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Save America’s Treasures Program.

  • DeGrazia Paints Cabeza de Vaca

    6300 N Swan Rd
    Tucson, AZ 85718
    DeGrazia Paints Cabeza de Vaca

    The story of the ill-fated Spanish expedition is told in this collection that includes sketches, watercolors, oils and enamels. DeGrazia read extensively about the adventures of the Spanish explorer Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, known as the first non-Native American to travel into what are now the states of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona.

    In 1527, Cabeza de Vaca and 600 Spanish conquistadors set sail for the Americas charged with conquering the Native Americans, converting them to Christianity and finding the seven cities of gold. Upon reaching the coast of Florida, only four men including Cabeza de Vaca, Alonso Castillo, Andrés Dorantes and his slave Estebán, an Arab Moor from Morocco, survived illness and the seas. The men embarked on a nine-year-long trek through Texas, New Mexico and Arizona battling starvation, cholera, malaria, mosquitoes and slavery at the hands of the Native Americans. Despite their struggles, Cabeza de Vaca learned to understand and appreciate the local tribes. In turn, the Native Americans came to believe the conquistadors had traveled from the sun and had great powers of healing. Crowds of Native Americans followed them in their journey and asked for blessings from the bearded strangers.

  • The Art of East Asia

    140 N Main Ave
    Tucson, AZ 85701
    The Art of East Asia

    The Asian collection of the Tucson Museum of Art includes major forms and periods from ancient times through the twentieth century. On view are selections from China, Japan, and Korea, dating from 2200 BCE to the mid-1900s, including ritual, burial, domestic, and traded items. Ceramics, stone, and carved materials have left an enduring record of human activity as well as regional diversity in this part of the world. Throughout history, artists and craftsmen looked toward religion for inspiration, and rulers tightly controlled production and exports. Ultimately, Asian art contributed to the development of decorative styles of objects across the globe, influencing art forms in Europe and the rest of the Western Hemisphere.

  • DeGrazia Paints Papago Indian Legends

    6300 N Swan Rd
    Tucson, AZ 85718
    DeGrazia Paints Papago Indian Legends

    DeGrazia created this collection in 1975 drawing inspiration from Papago legends. During the 1980s, the name Papago was officially changed to Tohono O’odham, which means Desert People in the O’odham language. DeGrazia depicts four legends (the Creation of the World, the Monster of Quitovac, the Eagle-man and Ho’ok) from traditional Tohono O’odham Nation stories.

  • The American Southwest and Western Traditions

    140 N Main Ave
    Tucson, AZ 85701
    The American Southwest and Western Traditions

    The American Southwest embodies diverse cultures, traditions, and histories that can be understood through art of the past and present. This gallery features regional art of the Southwest from the Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block collection by artists who spent time or were influenced by Arizona and the surrounding area, experiencing the region first hand.

Have FUN with us! Carnival Of Illusion