Event Oracle - The Oracle knows all

BEST Things To Do In Houston

The Event Oracle knows ALL the fun things to do in the land of the Houston sun. Select your date above then scroll down for all the Arts, Entertainment, and Events in my crystal ball...

  • John P. McGovern Hall of The Americas

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    John P. McGovern Hall of The Americas

    The John P. McGovern Hall of the Americas celebrates the remarkable diversity and extraordinary accomplishments of the indigenous peoples of the Americas, as well as the continuity of their rich cultural traditions.

    See the Museum’s magnificent collection of rugs, pottery, bead-work, kachina dolls, pre-Colombian gold, and other objects. Representing more than 50 diverse cultures from Alaska to Peru, these superb artifacts are complemented by innovative reconstructed environments and hands-on activities.

  • Hall of Ancient Egypt

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Hall of Ancient Egypt

    Safely ensconced in the Sahara desert, and drawing its lifeblood from the river Nile, ancient Egyptian civilization flourished for more than three millennia. A quintessential example of what archaeologists call a primary civilization,” ancient Egypt did not rely on inspiration from others to develop its own architecture, writing and religion—all of Egyptian culture was developed “in house.”

    The themes of writing, religion, natural resources and—of course—mummification will be explored in this new permanent exhibition hall.

    Ever since the late 18th century, the Western world has been exploring Egypt. This hall will present artifacts collected during these early days of investigations, and will also compare old-style archaeology with 21st-century approaches, such as using satellite imagery and remote sensing to locate and map ancient settlements. The Museum’s own mummy, Ankh Hap, has been moved to his new surroundings.

  • Frensley/Graham Hall of African Wildlife

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Frensley/Graham Hall of African Wildlife

    Unlike the traditional “menagerie” approach, this hall focuses on well-integrated themes of African wildlife ecology and conservation. Additionally, state-of-the-art interactives and video films enhance the experience.

    Explore seven biomes, each of which highlights a different theme relating to African Wildlife Ecology.

    Congo Basin: Explore uncharted wilderness in search of new species.

    West African Tropical Forest and Ethiopian Realm: Examine how primates and antelope co-exist.

    Serengeti Grassland: Observe intricate dynamics between predators and prey at many levels.

    Lowveld region: Survey the ecosystem and food chain, using the full complement of predators, prey and scavengers.

    Saharan Desert: Witness incredible birds migrations.

    Okavango Delta: Learn about the importance of water for organisms to survive.

  • Morian Hall of Paleontology

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Morian Hall of Paleontology

    The Morian Hall of Paleontology is packed with prehistoric beasts, and does not have the same stagnant displays of ancient skeletons standing in a row that many visitors are accustomed to seeing. Rather, the predators and prey in the new paleontology hall are in action – chasing, eating and escaping as they struggle for life. Embark on a “prehistoric safari” that also includes the grand saga of human evolution – from tree-climbing australopithecines to courageous mammoth-hunters.

  • Hamman Hall Of Texas Coastal Ecology

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Hamman Hall Of Texas Coastal Ecology

    The Texas coast is a natural treasure to many Texans, but few know about its ecologic and economic importance. The Hamman Hall of Texas Coastal Ecology shows visitors how a healthy environment is paramount to maintaining and sustaining a healthy economy. With about 2400 square feet of floor space and a 120 foot wall space adjacent to the new Farish Hall of Texas Wildlife, guests learn about the environmental characteristics of the Texas coast, as well as critical habitats, iconic species, concerns and impacts, recreation, and opportunities for conservation and restoration.

    “The Texas coast provides seemingly unlimited resources of many kinds for business, industry, education, recreation, and simply, personal enjoyment,” said Wes Tunnell, HMNS Curator of Marine Biology. “Consequently, many people want to live, work, and play on the Texas coast. Therefore, it is important to balance what we take from and how we use the coast. We now know that a healthy coastal environment leads to a healthy and sustainable coastal economy, so it is important to protect the natural environment which in turn protects the economy.”

  • Cullen Hall of Gems and Minerals

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Cullen Hall of Gems and Minerals

    From a huge blue topaz crystal weighing more than 2,000 carats to a crystallized gold cluster that is one of the most highly coveted objects in the mineral kingdom, the spectacular specimens on display here are true masterpieces – the Rembrandts and Picassos of the natural world.

    Discover more than 450 beautifully crystallized mineral specimens, including some of the world’s most rare and beautiful examples. Examine these dazzling treasures in detail from all angles through walk-around display cases illuminated by fiber-optic lighting to provide optimum viewing.

    The nearby Smith Gem Vault showcases stunning, gem-quality seashells from the world-class Guido T. Poppe Collection of Philippine Mollusks.

  • Vintage Texas Wildlife Dioramas

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Vintage Texas Wildlife Dioramas

    The new dioramas in the Education Wing have been a regular part of the museum for several decades. When their occupied space was deemed essential for renovation, museum staff was unable to simply throw away these dioramas with their rich and fine detail. Instead we decided to make an effort to do what museums do best – conserve these precious historical antiquities, preserving them for future generations to enjoy and appreciate.

    With research, we were able to determine when these incredible murals were painted. The Texas Gulf Coast scene is the oldest diorama on display. It was painted in the mid 1940s when the museum was located on its former grounds at the Houston Zoo. Initially this diorama was perhaps one-third its current depth; the walls were added in later years to match those of the other three. Travis Keese painted both the Prairie (1965) and Davis Mountains (1967) scenes during his tenure as museum staff artist (1964-71). The Big Thicket scene was done around 1969 by an artist name Harry Wortham. Keese was then contracted in 1996 to do conservation work on all of the murals, and also at that time painted the High Plains mural that is framed on the left. The murals were again touched-up by artist fabricators Brian Zievert and Robert Shuttlesworth during the 2014 reinstallation.

  • Wiess Energy Hall

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Wiess Energy Hall

    Dubbed Wiess Energy Hall 3.0, the third iteration of this popular hall has been enlarged from its previous 8,500 square feet to an expansive 30,000 square feet—almost the size of a football field. Joining the completely redesigned “classic” displays is a bonanza of entirely new exhibits, making the new hall the most contemporary, comprehensive and technologically advanced exhibition on the science and technology of energy anywhere in the world.

    Entering the new Wiess Energy Hall, visitors step off of the elevator into a dynamic floor of a 21st century offshore drilling rig populated by a motley crew of sci-fi robots. Near the center of the cavernous new hall, a replica of a tricone rotary drill bit—fourteen feet in diameter—spins vigorously overhead.

    Not far away, the completely reinvented Geovator takes visitors on a reimagined fantastic voyage plunging down through the Museum floors into the earth, then back in time to the Cretaceous Period for an attack by hungry pteranodons and a meteor strike.

    The new hall also features “Energy City,” a 2,500-square-foot 3-D landscape representing Houston, the surrounding Gulf coastal waters and the terrain of southeast and central Texas. This vibrant “white model” uses bleeding-edge projection mapping technology to bring to life the energy value chain.

  • 1515 Hermann Dr

    The Health Museum
    1515 Hermann Dr
    Houston, TX 77004
    1515 Hermann Dr

    The Health Museum welcomes you to explore the complexity and vast impact of human microbiomes through the engaging exhibition The Secret World Inside You. The exhibition introduces the microbiome, how it is created, and how it effects the human body through interactive tables and activities. Explore your own ecosystem and learn all about the community of creatures that your immune system, digestive system and brain rely on daily. Physical health is not the only thing that microbes can affect; learn how your mental health, including conditions like depression, are impacted by your microbiome. You can also meet microbes up close through multiple projections. The McGovern Theater will showcase surprising films that reveal the wonders of the human microbiome for all ages to enjoy.

  • Farish Hall of Texas Wildlife

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Farish Hall of Texas Wildlife

    The Houston Museum of Natural Science has had Texas Wildlife diorama displays since the early days when the museum was located across the street at the zoo. In 2014 several of the older murals underwent a renovation of supporting habitat and species, and today these vintage treasures can be viewed in the basement of the Education wing.

    Today’s version of the Farish Hall of Texas Wildlife is located on the 2nd floor, and showcases the remarkably diverse biomes of our beloved Lone Star State. Dioramas highlighting Piney Woods, Oak Motte, Coastal Prairie and Wetland are included as nearby regions, whereas South Texas Dry Forest, Guadelupe Mountains, and High Plains are further afield in other parts of the state. There are also kiosks focusing on extinct and vanishing species, invasive species in our state, and aberrantly colored individual animals.

    In total over 425 specimens representing approximately 250 species will be on display. Emphasis for this exhibit is placed on rare, endangered and extinct species. Over 50 species, more than 20% of those on display, are classified under some level of threat.

  • Herzstein Foucault Pendulum

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Herzstein Foucault Pendulum

    First exhibited in 1851 at the World’s Fair in Paris, the Foucault Pendulum (named after Jean Bernard Leon Foucault, the French physicist who invented it) is a visual demonstration of the Earth’s rotation.

    Throughout the day, the direction of the pendulum’s swing appears to change. Actually the Earth is turning under the pendulum as it swings. At Houston’s latitude (30° N.) the pendulum will precess through 180° or halfway around each day. During this time, it will knock down all of the pins.

  • Cabinet of Curiosities

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Cabinet of Curiosities

    Museums exist to inspire people to wonder and to facilitate creative thought. Given our curious natures and our innate desire to collect, it is no wonder that the grand modern museum has its humble roots firmly planted in the privately-owned collections of extraordinary objects from the past. These collections, called cabinets of curiosity, first became popular in the Renaissance and reached their pinnacle of popularity in the Victorian Era.

  • Strake Hall of Malacology

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Strake Hall of Malacology

    Malacology is the study of mollusks – invertebrate creatures with soft, unsegmented bodies, many of which house themselves in shells. This fascinating and highly diverse group of animals includes more than 100,000 species, ranging in size from snails so small that we can barely see them to giant squids more than 60 feet long.

    The Strake Hall of Malacology highlights these creatures through models, fossils, dioramas, living specimens, and hundreds of rare and spectacular shells.

  • Lester & Sue Smith Gem Vault

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Lester & Sue Smith Gem Vault

    The Lester and Sue Smith Gem Vault, the permanent exhibit hall at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, completes the story begun by the now world-renowned Cullen Hall of Gems and Minerals.

    In selecting many of the objects for inclusion in the Gem Vault, the Museum’s curators used their extensive connections in the mineralogical world to acquire mineral “cutting rough” of precious gemstones freshly extracted from mines around the world. The Museum could thus have these very best natural stones cut to its exact specifications into faceted gems of exact specifications, then crafted into original works under the skilled hands of jewelry designers, including Ernesto Moreira.

  • DeBakey Cell Lab

    The Health Museum
    1515 Hermann Dr
    Houston, TX 77004
    DeBakey Cell Lab

    You don’t need to be a scientist to enter, but you’ll feel like one when you leave!

    Gear up with a lab coat, gloves and goggles and travel through experiment stations in both English and Spanish. This hands-on exhibit is $3 for current members, and an additional $5 per person for non-members with the purchase of general admission to The Health Museum.  Travel through seven lab stations that get you up close and personal with cellular biology.  Your Cell Lab admission ticket permits access to up to 3 of the 7 lab stations per visit. Due to the complexity of the experiments, all guests, ages 13 and under, must be accompanied by an adult. It is required that all guests  must be ages 7 and above in order to participate in The DeBakey Cell Lab.

    The DeBakey Cell Lab is a distinct, new kind of museum experience. Honorably named after the respected and accomplished medical pioneer, Dr. Michael E. DeBakey, this bilingual exhibit is designed to introduce biology-based science to the public and inspire future scientists and science-lab leaders in the medical field.

  • An American Visual Language: Specimens of Historic Wood Type

    1324 W. Clay Street
    Houston, TX 77019
    An American Visual Language: Specimens of Historic Wood Type

    The use of wood as a tool for printing text has been employed for centuries. The Chinese first carved their alphabetical characters into individual pieces of wooden type in 868 CE. However, history, technology, and resources combined in an interesting way in nineteenth-century America, creating an aesthetic trend in printing that drew on historic type style and designs, but also innovated in news way that had not been seen before. As westward expansion brought Americans to settle across the country, the demand for printers and new printing technology also grew. The routing and pantograph machines allowed the forested land to be converted into wood type, which could be produced as a less expensive alternative to metal type. This new technology enabled new fonts to be developed around historiated letters that were typically used as display type. Now, entire alphabets of new fonts were created in a distinctly American aesthetic and in sizes not previously available.

    John Horn was first introduced to printing in high school in the mid-1960s. He would go on to work as a commercial printer for most of his life. After retiring in the 1980s he began collecting historic printing equipment and type and immersed himself in the history of printing and typography. He now is the owner of his own letterpress studio, Shooting Star Press, in Little Rock, Arkansas. He owns 2,700 fonts of metal type, 1,200 fonts of wood type, hundreds of fonts of line casting matrices and over 200 presses.  He draws largely from American Wood Type: 1828-1900, Rob Roy Kelly’s seminal text from 1977, for identifying and dating the wood type in his collection—situating American manufacturers as innovators in style.

    On display are selections of type specimens from The Printing Museum’s collection, which were printed in 2001-2002 by John Horn on his Vandercook Universal I Press.  The specimens consist of fonts that were produced by five type manufacturers:  Hamilton Manufacturing Company; William H. Page and Company; Vanderburgh, Wells & Company; Morgans & Wilcox; and Tubbs Manufacturing Company (also referred to as Tubbs & Company). These examples depict serif and sanserif fonts, including primary faces of Roman, Antique, and Gothic; secondary designs, such as Clarendon and Tuscan; and new families of type designs, such as Antique Tuscan. Further derivations can be seen in the condensed and expanded fonts, as well as Italic and outlined versions.

    On view in the Hallway Gallery. All prints on display are from the permanent collection of The Printing Museum.

  • Panto Hansel & Gretel

    3201 Allen Parkway, Suite 101
    Houston, TX 77019
    Panto Hansel & Gretel

    Follow the breadcrumbs into an outrageous reimagining of the tale of Hansel and Gretel as two selfish Houston parents pursue their dream to be stars of the theatre after leaving their social-media-obsessed children in the woods. It’s going to take Buttons to save the day, but he’s busy battling an ambitious wood-nymph determined to take his place as comic sidekick. Come ready to laugh, cheer and boo as all your Panto favorites join a new cast of characters to sing, dance and make joy for the whole family!

  • Houston Ballet - The Nutcracker

    Wortham Center, 500 Texas Ave,
    Houston, TX 77002
    Houston Ballet - The Nutcracker

    A true holiday ballet for the entire family, The Nutcracker is the perfect way to introduce young children to the power and beauty of classical dance. And now you can experience the story in a whole new way, with this 2018 holiday season production including choreography by incumbent artistic director, Australian-born Stanton Welch, and featuring new staging and costumes!

    Follow Clara on her journey from the family party to the Land of the Sweets. You'll see a Christmas tree that grows to magnificent heights, pihouetting dolls, flying cooks and lots of beautiful snow. With music by Piotr Tchaikovsky and stunning sets by Desmond Heeley, Welch's production has something to delight every member of your family. It just wouldn't be the holidays without The Nutcracker.

    What is The Nutcracker about?

    One snowy Christmas Eve, at a great townhouse where a party is in full swing, local magician Herr Drosselmeyer with gifts for the children, including a wooden nutcracker for Clara, the oldest daughter. When the doll is maliciously broken by her jealous younger brother Fritz, Clara and Drosselmeyer fix him with a hankerchief sling.

    When the clock strikes midnight after the party has finished, Clara's Christmas adventure begins when her Nutcracker comes to life as a handsome prince, leading our heroine Clara into a victorious battle between armed giant mice and his troop of tin soldiers, and onto a sleigh ride into the enchanted Land of Sweets where a festival awaits them, courtesy of the benevolent Sugar Plum Fairy and her court of dancing candies.

  • It's a Wonderful Life - A Live Radio Play

    10760 Grant Rd
    Houston, TX 77070
    It's a Wonderful Life - A Live Radio Play

    What better way to ring in the holiday season than with Frank Capra’s classic film brought to life as a 1946 radio broadcast, complete with vintage commercials and a live foley (sound effects) artist. George Bailey, a man with all the right stuff except luck, takes stock of his life one fateful Christmas Eve. His feckless guardian angel Clarence shows him that success can be measured in many ways, leading to an ending warmer than a hot mug of cocoa on a cold winter’s night. Fun for the whole family!

  • Elf the Musical

    The Hobby Center, 800 Bagby St
    Houston, TX 77002
    Elf the Musical

    The Hilarious Modern Holiday Classic

    If the thought of oversized manchild Will Ferrel squeezed into bright yellow tights immediately fills you with Christmas cheer, then TUTS' holiday production of Elf The Musical is sure to put a festive spring in your step! Based on the ever popular 2003 comedy film Elf, which has become a modern holiday classic in its own right, the stage adaptation first warmed the cockles during 2010 and 2012, winning over audiences with high spirited song and dance numbers, zany onstage gags and a few adult-aimed jokes for good measure. 

    Elf follows the fantastical story of Buddy, a young orphan who somehow manages to crawl into Santa's sack of presents and is accidentally whisked away to the North Pole. With seemingly no family to return to, Buddy is raised by Santa and his helpers as an elf, which proves problematic when he grows up and is distinctly different to the pint-sized toymakers. When Buddy learns the truth, he undertakes a hijink-filled journey to New York City in search of his birth parents.

  • Invention Convention

    1500 Binz St
    Houston, TX 77004
    Invention Convention

    Step into a workshop of gadgets and gizmos where kids create, concoct and construct contraptions and use their imagination to become inventors!
    Dream-up and design in a workshop filled with half-finished contraptions, bins of spare parts, project tables, schematics and various instruments from floor to ceiling.

    Experiment with LEGO® bricks, propellers, magnets, batteries, switches and buzzers through facilitated, hands-on experiments and mini-workshops.