Event Oracle - The Oracle knows all

BEST Things To Do In Houston

The Event Oracle knows ALL the fun things to do in the land of the Houston sun. Select your date above then scroll down for all the Arts, Entertainment, and Events in my crystal ball...

  • Hall of Ancient Egypt

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Hall of Ancient Egypt

    Safely ensconced in the Sahara desert, and drawing its lifeblood from the river Nile, ancient Egyptian civilization flourished for more than three millennia. A quintessential example of what archaeologists call a primary civilization,” ancient Egypt did not rely on inspiration from others to develop its own architecture, writing and religion—all of Egyptian culture was developed “in house.”

    The themes of writing, religion, natural resources and—of course—mummification will be explored in this new permanent exhibition hall.

    Ever since the late 18th century, the Western world has been exploring Egypt. This hall will present artifacts collected during these early days of investigations, and will also compare old-style archaeology with 21st-century approaches, such as using satellite imagery and remote sensing to locate and map ancient settlements. The Museum’s own mummy, Ankh Hap, has been moved to his new surroundings.

  • Hamman Hall Of Texas Coastal Ecology

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Hamman Hall Of Texas Coastal Ecology

    The Texas coast is a natural treasure to many Texans, but few know about its ecologic and economic importance. The Hamman Hall of Texas Coastal Ecology shows visitors how a healthy environment is paramount to maintaining and sustaining a healthy economy. With about 2400 square feet of floor space and a 120 foot wall space adjacent to the new Farish Hall of Texas Wildlife, guests learn about the environmental characteristics of the Texas coast, as well as critical habitats, iconic species, concerns and impacts, recreation, and opportunities for conservation and restoration.

    “The Texas coast provides seemingly unlimited resources of many kinds for business, industry, education, recreation, and simply, personal enjoyment,” said Wes Tunnell, HMNS Curator of Marine Biology. “Consequently, many people want to live, work, and play on the Texas coast. Therefore, it is important to balance what we take from and how we use the coast. We now know that a healthy coastal environment leads to a healthy and sustainable coastal economy, so it is important to protect the natural environment which in turn protects the economy.”

  • Farish Hall of Texas Wildlife

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Farish Hall of Texas Wildlife

    The Houston Museum of Natural Science has had Texas Wildlife diorama displays since the early days when the museum was located across the street at the zoo. In 2014 several of the older murals underwent a renovation of supporting habitat and species, and today these vintage treasures can be viewed in the basement of the Education wing.

    Today’s version of the Farish Hall of Texas Wildlife is located on the 2nd floor, and showcases the remarkably diverse biomes of our beloved Lone Star State. Dioramas highlighting Piney Woods, Oak Motte, Coastal Prairie and Wetland are included as nearby regions, whereas South Texas Dry Forest, Guadelupe Mountains, and High Plains are further afield in other parts of the state. There are also kiosks focusing on extinct and vanishing species, invasive species in our state, and aberrantly colored individual animals.

    In total over 425 specimens representing approximately 250 species will be on display. Emphasis for this exhibit is placed on rare, endangered and extinct species. Over 50 species, more than 20% of those on display, are classified under some level of threat.

  • William Forsythe: Choreographic Objects

    1001 Bissonnet
    Houston, TX 77005
    William Forsythe: Choreographic Objects

    This summer, the MFAH invites visitors to engage with the fundamental ideas of dance, weight, and movement in time. The immersive exhibition William Forsythe: Choreographic Objects blurs the lines between performance, sculpture, and installation.

    American dancer and choreographer William Forsythe is known for his groundbreaking combination of choreography, staging, lighting, and dance analysis. The artist (born 1949) has changed the landscape of contemporary dance with his focus on how the human body moves through space.

  • Death by Natural Causes

    5555 Hermann Park D
    Houston, TX 77030
    Death by Natural Causes

    Snakes. Spiders. Sharks.  The things you fear are the least of your worries! Death by Natural Causes will introduce patrons to the range of “animal, vegetable and mineral” dangers that lurk in their everyday lives.  Through a collection of specimens, text and interactives, visitors can see what can cause a death, either directly or indirectly, from the natural world. Poisonous, venomous and toxic are just a few of the terms that will be clarified, and things you interact with almost daily will be used as examples—mushrooms, snakes, spiders and even common foods! Old wives tales and urban myths will be debunked, as visitors travel through five general areas of rich graphics, compelling visuals and surprising specimens.

  • Icons of Style: A Century of Fashion Photography

    1001 Bissonnet
    Houston, TX 77005
    Icons of Style: A Century of Fashion Photography

    Explore the rich and varied history of fashion photography through Icons of Style: A Century of Fashion Photography. More than 200 photographs by famous practitioners and lesser-known, yet influential, artists trace the movement’s trajectory from niche industry to powerful cultural force, and its gradual recognition as an art form.

    Icons of Style showcases a broad and diverse view of fashion and fashion photography—from the elegant portraits of Harlem’s best dressed in the 1930s; to the trendsetting fashions of Beyoncé, David Bowie, Grace Jones, Run DMC, and Salt-N-Pepa; to images that have graced the pages of Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Ebony, and Essence. The exhibition features local, national, and international loans, augmented with works from the MFAH collections.

  • An American Visual Language: Specimens of Historic Wood Type

    1324 W. Clay Street
    Houston, TX 77019
    An American Visual Language: Specimens of Historic Wood Type

    The use of wood as a tool for printing text has been employed for centuries. The Chinese first carved their alphabetical characters into individual pieces of wooden type in 868 CE. However, history, technology, and resources combined in an interesting way in nineteenth-century America, creating an aesthetic trend in printing that drew on historic type style and designs, but also innovated in news way that had not been seen before. As westward expansion brought Americans to settle across the country, the demand for printers and new printing technology also grew. The routing and pantograph machines allowed the forested land to be converted into wood type, which could be produced as a less expensive alternative to metal type. This new technology enabled new fonts to be developed around historiated letters that were typically used as display type. Now, entire alphabets of new fonts were created in a distinctly American aesthetic and in sizes not previously available.

    John Horn was first introduced to printing in high school in the mid-1960s. He would go on to work as a commercial printer for most of his life. After retiring in the 1980s he began collecting historic printing equipment and type and immersed himself in the history of printing and typography. He now is the owner of his own letterpress studio, Shooting Star Press, in Little Rock, Arkansas. He owns 2,700 fonts of metal type, 1,200 fonts of wood type, hundreds of fonts of line casting matrices and over 200 presses.  He draws largely from American Wood Type: 1828-1900, Rob Roy Kelly’s seminal text from 1977, for identifying and dating the wood type in his collection—situating American manufacturers as innovators in style.

    On display are selections of type specimens from The Printing Museum’s collection, which were printed in 2001-2002 by John Horn on his Vandercook Universal I Press.  The specimens consist of fonts that were produced by five type manufacturers:  Hamilton Manufacturing Company; William H. Page and Company; Vanderburgh, Wells & Company; Morgans & Wilcox; and Tubbs Manufacturing Company (also referred to as Tubbs & Company). These examples depict serif and sanserif fonts, including primary faces of Roman, Antique, and Gothic; secondary designs, such as Clarendon and Tuscan; and new families of type designs, such as Antique Tuscan. Further derivations can be seen in the condensed and expanded fonts, as well as Italic and outlined versions.

    On view in the Hallway Gallery. All prints on display are from the permanent collection of The Printing Museum.

  • Between Play and Grief: Selections from the Latino American Collection

    1001 Bissonnet
    Houston, TX 77005
    Between Play and Grief: Selections from the Latino American Collection

    Between Play and Grief: Selections from the Latino American Collection features a survey of works from the MFAH collection of modern and contemporary Latin American and Latinx art.

    The exhibition presents more than three dozen works of art acquired by the MFAH over the past 10 years. The selection spans six decades of artistic expression, from figures who were actively in dialogue with leading postwar artistic movements such as Nouveau Réalisme, Arte Povera, and Pop Art in the 1960s, to contemporary artists whose work speaks to their identities as both insiders and outsiders within an American experience.

    All of the artists in the exhibition rely on parody and dark wit to express social and political realities. Between Play and Grief includes the work of Amalia Mesa-Bains, Antonio Berni, Juan Carlos Distéfano, Alberto Heredia, Luis Jiménez, Rómulo Macció, César Augusto Martínez, Mondongo, Celia Alvárez Muñoz, Luis Felipe Noé, Marcos Raya, Vincent Valdez, and Jorge de la Vega.

  • THEN and NOW

    Art Car Museum
    140 Heights Blvd
    Houston, TX 77007
    THEN and NOW

    Ann and James Harithas are pleased to announce the opening of:THEN and NOW

    The longevity of a core group of artists, starting in the 80’s at U. of H. Lawndale, is the impetus for this show THEN and NOW.

    The LU group is unified by 40 years of friendship and art.

    This unique opportunity for an overview of 4 decades of work, with 2-3 pieces from each artist, will show their evolution of vision.

  • Dissection Days on Free Family Thursdays

    1515 Hermann Drive
    Houston, TX 77004
    Dissection Days on Free Family Thursdays

    Have you ever wanted to be a surgeon for a day? Or, wonder what it’s like to hold a heart in your hand? Hands-on dissections take place every Free Family Thursday at 3 p.m. at The Health Museum in the Houston Museum District. Curious about what's going on inside your body? Explore the anatomy of your body and its organ functions with an assortment of exciting activities and live demonstrations for all ages. The Health Museum invites the whole family to come in and get involved with its Dissection Days on Free Family Thursdays! Parents and children will learn together about the anatomy and physiology of a variety of animal organs from a cow’s eyeball to a sheep’s brain. Visitors will engage and learn about the internal and external structures of different organs such as the liver, brain, and the heart. This learning journey will also demonstrate the body’s different systems: cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, immune, and how tissues and organs are interrelated. Come explore the interactive lab and learn literally from the inside out!

  • Steak Night at The Maple Leaf

    514 Elgin St.
    Houston, TX 77006
    Steak Night at The Maple Leaf

    Thursday night means Steak Night at The Maple Leaf Pub. Not only will you be able to sink your teeth into some of the best steak of your life, you'll be able to play along with Geeks Who Drink Pub Quizzes. Put your team together and come out! 

    The meal includes a gorgeous, 14-16oz upper top choice ribeye that comes with a baked potato for $16. Add a side of delicious seasoned and grilled asparagus for $2. 

    While you wait, you can take on your friends in darts, air hockey or bubble hockey. 

  • Thursday Wine and Music

    2509 Rice Blvd.
    Houston, TX 77005
    Thursday Wine and Music

    Join us for a relaxing evening - good music, good wine, and good people. Our talented musicians, Jabari and Ashdin, are playing blues and jazz for you. Rosinka is offering happy hour wines and food.

  • Live Music at the original Ginger Man

    5607 Morningside
    Houston, TX 77005
    Live Music at the original Ginger Man

    Sip on our widespread selection of beers while listening to live music in our back beer garden every Thursday from 7:00 to 10:00! Each week we rotate acoustic dreamboat Scott Morrison with newcomers with different styles and flavors. Whether you like acoustic covers of pop songs or original ballads, both artists got you covered.

  • Agatha Christie's Murder on the Orient Express

    Alley Theater, 615 Texas Ave
    Houston, TX 77002
    Agatha Christie's Murder on the Orient Express

    Agatha Christie's famed and celebrated Murder on the Orient Express is largely considered to be one of the late writer's greatest works. The intriguing mystery has been adapted across television, film and stage and remains just as thrilling today as it was when it was first published in 1934. Catch the unmissable show this summer at Houston's Alley Theatre.

    The story takes us to the 1930s located somewhere between the Middle East and London as detective Poirot is traveling home. His trip is shockingly interrupted by the death of an American tycoon who displays evidence of several stab wounds. With a killer onboard who will solve this exciting whodunnit and bring the murderer to justice?

    Adapted by playwright Ken Ludwig, watch a refreshing take on one of the greatest murder mysteries ever written.

  • Invention Convention

    1500 Binz St
    Houston, TX 77004
    Invention Convention

    Step into a workshop of gadgets and gizmos where kids create, concoct and construct contraptions and use their imagination to become inventors!
    Dream-up and design in a workshop filled with half-finished contraptions, bins of spare parts, project tables, schematics and various instruments from floor to ceiling.

    Experiment with LEGO® bricks, propellers, magnets, batteries, switches and buzzers through facilitated, hands-on experiments and mini-workshops.