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BEST Things To Do In Houston Tomorrow

The Event Oracle knows ALL the fun things to do in the land of the Houston sun. Select your date above then scroll down for all the Arts, Entertainment, and Events in my crystal ball...

  • Dinosaurs

    Houston Zoo
    6200 Hermann Park Drive
    Houston, TX 77030
    Dinosaurs

    Travel back in time and come face to face with a lifelike Tyrannosaurs Rex, Stegosaurus, Utahraptor, and more!

  • Hall of Ancient Egypt

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Hall of Ancient Egypt

    Safely ensconced in the Sahara desert, and drawing its lifeblood from the river Nile, ancient Egyptian civilization flourished for more than three millennia. A quintessential example of what archaeologists call a primary civilization,” ancient Egypt did not rely on inspiration from others to develop its own architecture, writing and religion—all of Egyptian culture was developed “in house.”

    The themes of writing, religion, natural resources and—of course—mummification will be explored in this new permanent exhibition hall.

    Ever since the late 18th century, the Western world has been exploring Egypt. This hall will present artifacts collected during these early days of investigations, and will also compare old-style archaeology with 21st-century approaches, such as using satellite imagery and remote sensing to locate and map ancient settlements. The Museum’s own mummy, Ankh Hap, has been moved to his new surroundings.

  • Morian Hall of Paleontology

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Morian Hall of Paleontology

    The Morian Hall of Paleontology is packed with prehistoric beasts, and does not have the same stagnant displays of ancient skeletons standing in a row that many visitors are accustomed to seeing. Rather, the predators and prey in the new paleontology hall are in action – chasing, eating and escaping as they struggle for life. Embark on a “prehistoric safari” that also includes the grand saga of human evolution – from tree-climbing australopithecines to courageous mammoth-hunters.

  • Cullen Hall of Gems and Minerals

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Cullen Hall of Gems and Minerals

    From a huge blue topaz crystal weighing more than 2,000 carats to a crystallized gold cluster that is one of the most highly coveted objects in the mineral kingdom, the spectacular specimens on display here are true masterpieces – the Rembrandts and Picassos of the natural world.

    Discover more than 450 beautifully crystallized mineral specimens, including some of the world’s most rare and beautiful examples. Examine these dazzling treasures in detail from all angles through walk-around display cases illuminated by fiber-optic lighting to provide optimum viewing.

    The nearby Smith Gem Vault showcases stunning, gem-quality seashells from the world-class Guido T. Poppe Collection of Philippine Mollusks.

  • Dinosaurs

    Houston Zoo
    6200 Hermann Park Drive
    Houston, TX 77030
    Dinosaurs

    Travel back in time and come face to face with a lifelike Tyrannosaurs Rex, Stegosaurus, Utahraptor, and more!

  • Herzstein Foucault Pendulum

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Herzstein Foucault Pendulum

    First exhibited in 1851 at the World’s Fair in Paris, the Foucault Pendulum (named after Jean Bernard Leon Foucault, the French physicist who invented it) is a visual demonstration of the Earth’s rotation.

    Throughout the day, the direction of the pendulum’s swing appears to change. Actually the Earth is turning under the pendulum as it swings. At Houston’s latitude (30° N.) the pendulum will precess through 180° or halfway around each day. During this time, it will knock down all of the pins.

  • Lester & Sue Smith Gem Vault

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Lester & Sue Smith Gem Vault

    The Lester and Sue Smith Gem Vault, the permanent exhibit hall at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, completes the story begun by the now world-renowned Cullen Hall of Gems and Minerals.

    In selecting many of the objects for inclusion in the Gem Vault, the Museum’s curators used their extensive connections in the mineralogical world to acquire mineral “cutting rough” of precious gemstones freshly extracted from mines around the world. The Museum could thus have these very best natural stones cut to its exact specifications into faceted gems of exact specifications, then crafted into original works under the skilled hands of jewelry designers, including Ernesto Moreira.

  • Hamman Hall Of Texas Coastal Ecology

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Hamman Hall Of Texas Coastal Ecology

    The Texas coast is a natural treasure to many Texans, but few know about its ecologic and economic importance. The Hamman Hall of Texas Coastal Ecology shows visitors how a healthy environment is paramount to maintaining and sustaining a healthy economy. With about 2400 square feet of floor space and a 120 foot wall space adjacent to the new Farish Hall of Texas Wildlife, guests learn about the environmental characteristics of the Texas coast, as well as critical habitats, iconic species, concerns and impacts, recreation, and opportunities for conservation and restoration.

    “The Texas coast provides seemingly unlimited resources of many kinds for business, industry, education, recreation, and simply, personal enjoyment,” said Wes Tunnell, HMNS Curator of Marine Biology. “Consequently, many people want to live, work, and play on the Texas coast. Therefore, it is important to balance what we take from and how we use the coast. We now know that a healthy coastal environment leads to a healthy and sustainable coastal economy, so it is important to protect the natural environment which in turn protects the economy.”

  • Cabinet of Curiosities

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Cabinet of Curiosities

    Museums exist to inspire people to wonder and to facilitate creative thought. Given our curious natures and our innate desire to collect, it is no wonder that the grand modern museum has its humble roots firmly planted in the privately-owned collections of extraordinary objects from the past. These collections, called cabinets of curiosity, first became popular in the Renaissance and reached their pinnacle of popularity in the Victorian Era.

  • Farish Hall of Texas Wildlife

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Farish Hall of Texas Wildlife

    The Houston Museum of Natural Science has had Texas Wildlife diorama displays since the early days when the museum was located across the street at the zoo. In 2014 several of the older murals underwent a renovation of supporting habitat and species, and today these vintage treasures can be viewed in the basement of the Education wing.

    Today’s version of the Farish Hall of Texas Wildlife is located on the 2nd floor, and showcases the remarkably diverse biomes of our beloved Lone Star State. Dioramas highlighting Piney Woods, Oak Motte, Coastal Prairie and Wetland are included as nearby regions, whereas South Texas Dry Forest, Guadelupe Mountains, and High Plains are further afield in other parts of the state. There are also kiosks focusing on extinct and vanishing species, invasive species in our state, and aberrantly colored individual animals.

    In total over 425 specimens representing approximately 250 species will be on display. Emphasis for this exhibit is placed on rare, endangered and extinct species. Over 50 species, more than 20% of those on display, are classified under some level of threat.

  • Strake Hall of Malacology

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Strake Hall of Malacology

    Malacology is the study of mollusks – invertebrate creatures with soft, unsegmented bodies, many of which house themselves in shells. This fascinating and highly diverse group of animals includes more than 100,000 species, ranging in size from snails so small that we can barely see them to giant squids more than 60 feet long.

    The Strake Hall of Malacology highlights these creatures through models, fossils, dioramas, living specimens, and hundreds of rare and spectacular shells.

  • DeBakey Cell Lab

    The Health Museum
    1515 Hermann Dr
    Houston, TX 77004
    DeBakey Cell Lab

    You don’t need to be a scientist to enter, but you’ll feel like one when you leave!

    Gear up with a lab coat, gloves and goggles and travel through experiment stations in both English and Spanish. This hands-on exhibit is $3 for current members, and an additional $5 per person for non-members with the purchase of general admission to The Health Museum.  Travel through seven lab stations that get you up close and personal with cellular biology.  Your Cell Lab admission ticket permits access to up to 3 of the 7 lab stations per visit. Due to the complexity of the experiments, all guests, ages 13 and under, must be accompanied by an adult. It is required that all guests  must be ages 7 and above in order to participate in The DeBakey Cell Lab.

    The DeBakey Cell Lab is a distinct, new kind of museum experience. Honorably named after the respected and accomplished medical pioneer, Dr. Michael E. DeBakey, this bilingual exhibit is designed to introduce biology-based science to the public and inspire future scientists and science-lab leaders in the medical field.

  • Stonewall 50

    Contemporary Arts Museum Houston
    5216 Montrose Blvd
    Houston, TX 77006
    Stonewall 50

    On June 28, 1969, a police raid of the gay bar Stonewall Inn in New York City, New York resulted in a revolt by its patrons. Their anger and frustration erupted into days and weeks of street protests that catalyzed cultural change as queer individuals realized their political power. Fed up with being persecuted for sexual and gender choices, queer communities and their allies began working both individually and in coalitions to advocate for self-determination, equality, and civil rights.

     

    Stonewall 50 is an exhibition conceived as a snapshot of the complexion, interests, and activities of a diverse group of queer and allied artists. Whether working in local communities or on other continents, these artists’ responses to the worlds around them—in photographs, paintings, films and videos, sculptures, performances, and other media—address a range of personal and collective concerns and desires. Stonewall 50 follows a number of paths: it traces artists’ engagement with trans visibility; suggests possibilities for formal and conceptual inter-generational dialogue; and looks outside the United States to consider queer issues abroad. While these themes provide a framework for the exhibition, the show’s contents are not limited to artworks exploring these notions. This exhibition is organized with an understanding that the privileges and disadvantages that affect the self-determination of sex and gender expression are linked inextricably to cultural perceptions around ability, age, nationality, race, wealth, and a host of other issues.

  • Death by Natural Causes

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park D
    Houston, TX 77030
    Death by Natural Causes

    Snakes. Spiders. Sharks.  The things you fear are the least of your worries! Death by Natural Causes will introduce patrons to the range of “animal, vegetable and mineral” dangers that lurk in their everyday lives.  Through a collection of specimens, text and interactives, visitors can see what can cause a death, either directly or indirectly, from the natural world. Poisonous, venomous and toxic are just a few of the terms that will be clarified, and things you interact with almost daily will be used as examples—mushrooms, snakes, spiders and even common foods! Old wives tales and urban myths will be debunked, as visitors travel through five general areas of rich graphics, compelling visuals and surprising specimens.

  • Icons of Style: A Century of Fashion Photography

    Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
    1001 Bissonnet
    Houston, TX 77005
    Icons of Style: A Century of Fashion Photography

    Explore the rich and varied history of fashion photography through Icons of Style: A Century of Fashion Photography. More than 200 photographs by famous practitioners and lesser-known, yet influential, artists trace the movement’s trajectory from niche industry to powerful cultural force, and its gradual recognition as an art form.

    Icons of Style showcases a broad and diverse view of fashion and fashion photography—from the elegant portraits of Harlem’s best dressed in the 1930s; to the trendsetting fashions of Beyoncé, David Bowie, Grace Jones, Run DMC, and Salt-N-Pepa; to images that have graced the pages of Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Ebony, and Essence. The exhibition features local, national, and international loans, augmented with works from the MFAH collections.

  • An American Visual Language: Specimens of Historic Wood Type

    The Printing Museum
    1324 W. Clay Street
    Houston, TX 77019
    An American Visual Language: Specimens of Historic Wood Type

    The use of wood as a tool for printing text has been employed for centuries. The Chinese first carved their alphabetical characters into individual pieces of wooden type in 868 CE. However, history, technology, and resources combined in an interesting way in nineteenth-century America, creating an aesthetic trend in printing that drew on historic type style and designs, but also innovated in news way that had not been seen before. As westward expansion brought Americans to settle across the country, the demand for printers and new printing technology also grew. The routing and pantograph machines allowed the forested land to be converted into wood type, which could be produced as a less expensive alternative to metal type. This new technology enabled new fonts to be developed around historiated letters that were typically used as display type. Now, entire alphabets of new fonts were created in a distinctly American aesthetic and in sizes not previously available.

    John Horn was first introduced to printing in high school in the mid-1960s. He would go on to work as a commercial printer for most of his life. After retiring in the 1980s he began collecting historic printing equipment and type and immersed himself in the history of printing and typography. He now is the owner of his own letterpress studio, Shooting Star Press, in Little Rock, Arkansas. He owns 2,700 fonts of metal type, 1,200 fonts of wood type, hundreds of fonts of line casting matrices and over 200 presses.  He draws largely from American Wood Type: 1828-1900, Rob Roy Kelly’s seminal text from 1977, for identifying and dating the wood type in his collection—situating American manufacturers as innovators in style.

    On display are selections of type specimens from The Printing Museum’s collection, which were printed in 2001-2002 by John Horn on his Vandercook Universal I Press.  The specimens consist of fonts that were produced by five type manufacturers:  Hamilton Manufacturing Company; William H. Page and Company; Vanderburgh, Wells & Company; Morgans & Wilcox; and Tubbs Manufacturing Company (also referred to as Tubbs & Company). These examples depict serif and sanserif fonts, including primary faces of Roman, Antique, and Gothic; secondary designs, such as Clarendon and Tuscan; and new families of type designs, such as Antique Tuscan. Further derivations can be seen in the condensed and expanded fonts, as well as Italic and outlined versions.

    On view in the Hallway Gallery. All prints on display are from the permanent collection of The Printing Museum.

  • Between Play and Grief: Selections from the Latino American Collection

    Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
    1001 Bissonnet
    Houston, TX 77005
    Between Play and Grief: Selections from the Latino American Collection

    Between Play and Grief: Selections from the Latino American Collection features a survey of works from the MFAH collection of modern and contemporary Latin American and Latinx art.

    The exhibition presents more than three dozen works of art acquired by the MFAH over the past 10 years. The selection spans six decades of artistic expression, from figures who were actively in dialogue with leading postwar artistic movements such as Nouveau Réalisme, Arte Povera, and Pop Art in the 1960s, to contemporary artists whose work speaks to their identities as both insiders and outsiders within an American experience.

    All of the artists in the exhibition rely on parody and dark wit to express social and political realities. Between Play and Grief includes the work of Amalia Mesa-Bains, Antonio Berni, Juan Carlos Distéfano, Alberto Heredia, Luis Jiménez, Rómulo Macció, César Augusto Martínez, Mondongo, Celia Alvárez Muñoz, Luis Felipe Noé, Marcos Raya, Vincent Valdez, and Jorge de la Vega.

  • William Forsythe: Choreographic Objects

    Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
    1001 Bissonnet
    Houston, TX 77005
    William Forsythe: Choreographic Objects

    This summer, the MFAH invites visitors to engage with the fundamental ideas of dance, weight, and movement in time. The immersive exhibition William Forsythe: Choreographic Objects blurs the lines between performance, sculpture, and installation.

    American dancer and choreographer William Forsythe is known for his groundbreaking combination of choreography, staging, lighting, and dance analysis. The artist (born 1949) has changed the landscape of contemporary dance with his focus on how the human body moves through space.

  • THEN and NOW

    Art Car Museum
    140 Heights Blvd
    Houston, TX 77007
    THEN and NOW

    Ann and James Harithas are pleased to announce the opening of:THEN and NOW

    The longevity of a core group of artists, starting in the 80’s at U. of H. Lawndale, is the impetus for this show THEN and NOW.

    The LU group is unified by 40 years of friendship and art.

    This unique opportunity for an overview of 4 decades of work, with 2-3 pieces from each artist, will show their evolution of vision.

  • Disney's Aladdin

    Broadway at the Hobby Center
    800 Bagby St
    Houston, TX 77002
    Disney's Aladdin

    Aladdin, adapted from the Academy Award®-winning animated Disney film and centuries-old folktales including “One Thousand and One Nights,” is brought to fresh theatrical life in this bold new musical. Aladdin’s journey sweeps audiences into an exotic world of daring adventure, classic comedy and timeless romance. This new production features a full score, including the five cherished songs from the Academy Award®-winning soundtrack and more written especially for the stage.

  • Invention Convention

    Children's Museum of Houston
    1500 Binz St
    Houston, TX 77004
    Invention Convention

    Step into a workshop of gadgets and gizmos where kids create, concoct and construct contraptions and use their imagination to become inventors!
    Dream-up and design in a workshop filled with half-finished contraptions, bins of spare parts, project tables, schematics and various instruments from floor to ceiling.

    Experiment with LEGO® bricks, propellers, magnets, batteries, switches and buzzers through facilitated, hands-on experiments and mini-workshops.