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BEST Things To Do In Houston

The Event Oracle knows ALL the fun things to do in the land of the Houston sun. Select your date above then scroll down for all the Arts, Entertainment, and Events in my crystal ball...

  • Hall of Ancient Egypt

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Hall of Ancient Egypt

    Safely ensconced in the Sahara desert, and drawing its lifeblood from the river Nile, ancient Egyptian civilization flourished for more than three millennia. A quintessential example of what archaeologists call a primary civilization,” ancient Egypt did not rely on inspiration from others to develop its own architecture, writing and religion—all of Egyptian culture was developed “in house.”

    The themes of writing, religion, natural resources and—of course—mummification will be explored in this new permanent exhibition hall.

    Ever since the late 18th century, the Western world has been exploring Egypt. This hall will present artifacts collected during these early days of investigations, and will also compare old-style archaeology with 21st-century approaches, such as using satellite imagery and remote sensing to locate and map ancient settlements. The Museum’s own mummy, Ankh Hap, has been moved to his new surroundings.

  • Hamman Hall Of Texas Coastal Ecology

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Hamman Hall Of Texas Coastal Ecology

    The Texas coast is a natural treasure to many Texans, but few know about its ecologic and economic importance. The Hamman Hall of Texas Coastal Ecology shows visitors how a healthy environment is paramount to maintaining and sustaining a healthy economy. With about 2400 square feet of floor space and a 120 foot wall space adjacent to the new Farish Hall of Texas Wildlife, guests learn about the environmental characteristics of the Texas coast, as well as critical habitats, iconic species, concerns and impacts, recreation, and opportunities for conservation and restoration.

    “The Texas coast provides seemingly unlimited resources of many kinds for business, industry, education, recreation, and simply, personal enjoyment,” said Wes Tunnell, HMNS Curator of Marine Biology. “Consequently, many people want to live, work, and play on the Texas coast. Therefore, it is important to balance what we take from and how we use the coast. We now know that a healthy coastal environment leads to a healthy and sustainable coastal economy, so it is important to protect the natural environment which in turn protects the economy.”

  • Farish Hall of Texas Wildlife

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Farish Hall of Texas Wildlife

    The Houston Museum of Natural Science has had Texas Wildlife diorama displays since the early days when the museum was located across the street at the zoo. In 2014 several of the older murals underwent a renovation of supporting habitat and species, and today these vintage treasures can be viewed in the basement of the Education wing.

    Today’s version of the Farish Hall of Texas Wildlife is located on the 2nd floor, and showcases the remarkably diverse biomes of our beloved Lone Star State. Dioramas highlighting Piney Woods, Oak Motte, Coastal Prairie and Wetland are included as nearby regions, whereas South Texas Dry Forest, Guadelupe Mountains, and High Plains are further afield in other parts of the state. There are also kiosks focusing on extinct and vanishing species, invasive species in our state, and aberrantly colored individual animals.

    In total over 425 specimens representing approximately 250 species will be on display. Emphasis for this exhibit is placed on rare, endangered and extinct species. Over 50 species, more than 20% of those on display, are classified under some level of threat.

  • An American Visual Language: Specimens of Historic Wood Type

    1324 W. Clay Street
    Houston, TX 77019
    An American Visual Language: Specimens of Historic Wood Type

    The use of wood as a tool for printing text has been employed for centuries. The Chinese first carved their alphabetical characters into individual pieces of wooden type in 868 CE. However, history, technology, and resources combined in an interesting way in nineteenth-century America, creating an aesthetic trend in printing that drew on historic type style and designs, but also innovated in news way that had not been seen before. As westward expansion brought Americans to settle across the country, the demand for printers and new printing technology also grew. The routing and pantograph machines allowed the forested land to be converted into wood type, which could be produced as a less expensive alternative to metal type. This new technology enabled new fonts to be developed around historiated letters that were typically used as display type. Now, entire alphabets of new fonts were created in a distinctly American aesthetic and in sizes not previously available.

    John Horn was first introduced to printing in high school in the mid-1960s. He would go on to work as a commercial printer for most of his life. After retiring in the 1980s he began collecting historic printing equipment and type and immersed himself in the history of printing and typography. He now is the owner of his own letterpress studio, Shooting Star Press, in Little Rock, Arkansas. He owns 2,700 fonts of metal type, 1,200 fonts of wood type, hundreds of fonts of line casting matrices and over 200 presses.  He draws largely from American Wood Type: 1828-1900, Rob Roy Kelly’s seminal text from 1977, for identifying and dating the wood type in his collection—situating American manufacturers as innovators in style.

    On display are selections of type specimens from The Printing Museum’s collection, which were printed in 2001-2002 by John Horn on his Vandercook Universal I Press.  The specimens consist of fonts that were produced by five type manufacturers:  Hamilton Manufacturing Company; William H. Page and Company; Vanderburgh, Wells & Company; Morgans & Wilcox; and Tubbs Manufacturing Company (also referred to as Tubbs & Company). These examples depict serif and sanserif fonts, including primary faces of Roman, Antique, and Gothic; secondary designs, such as Clarendon and Tuscan; and new families of type designs, such as Antique Tuscan. Further derivations can be seen in the condensed and expanded fonts, as well as Italic and outlined versions.

    On view in the Hallway Gallery. All prints on display are from the permanent collection of The Printing Museum.