Event Oracle - The Oracle knows all

BEST Things To Do In Houston

The Event Oracle knows ALL the fun things to do in the land of the Houston sun. Select your date above then scroll down for all the Arts, Entertainment, and Events in my crystal ball...

  • Hall of Ancient Egypt

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Hall of Ancient Egypt

    Safely ensconced in the Sahara desert, and drawing its lifeblood from the river Nile, ancient Egyptian civilization flourished for more than three millennia. A quintessential example of what archaeologists call a primary civilization,” ancient Egypt did not rely on inspiration from others to develop its own architecture, writing and religion—all of Egyptian culture was developed “in house.”

    The themes of writing, religion, natural resources and—of course—mummification will be explored in this new permanent exhibition hall.

    Ever since the late 18th century, the Western world has been exploring Egypt. This hall will present artifacts collected during these early days of investigations, and will also compare old-style archaeology with 21st-century approaches, such as using satellite imagery and remote sensing to locate and map ancient settlements. The Museum’s own mummy, Ankh Hap, has been moved to his new surroundings.

  • Wiess Energy Hall

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Wiess Energy Hall

    Dubbed Wiess Energy Hall 3.0, the third iteration of this popular hall has been enlarged from its previous 8,500 square feet to an expansive 30,000 square feet—almost the size of a football field. Joining the completely redesigned “classic” displays is a bonanza of entirely new exhibits, making the new hall the most contemporary, comprehensive and technologically advanced exhibition on the science and technology of energy anywhere in the world.

    Entering the new Wiess Energy Hall, visitors step off of the elevator into a dynamic floor of a 21st century offshore drilling rig populated by a motley crew of sci-fi robots. Near the center of the cavernous new hall, a replica of a tricone rotary drill bit—fourteen feet in diameter—spins vigorously overhead.

    Not far away, the completely reinvented Geovator takes visitors on a reimagined fantastic voyage plunging down through the Museum floors into the earth, then back in time to the Cretaceous Period for an attack by hungry pteranodons and a meteor strike.

    The new hall also features “Energy City,” a 2,500-square-foot 3-D landscape representing Houston, the surrounding Gulf coastal waters and the terrain of southeast and central Texas. This vibrant “white model” uses bleeding-edge projection mapping technology to bring to life the energy value chain.

  • Farmers Market at Imperial

    Farmers Market at Imperial
    234 Matlage Way
    Sugarland, TX 77478
    Farmers Market at Imperial

    In addition to a wonderful selection of vendors, the Farmers Market brings you family fun! Each week, the Market features live music, cooking demonstrations or other seasonal entertainment. Presented by the Fort Bend Chamber of Commerce.

  • John P. McGovern Hall of The Americas

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    John P. McGovern Hall of The Americas

    The John P. McGovern Hall of the Americas celebrates the remarkable diversity and extraordinary accomplishments of the indigenous peoples of the Americas, as well as the continuity of their rich cultural traditions.

    See the Museum’s magnificent collection of rugs, pottery, bead-work, kachina dolls, pre-Colombian gold, and other objects. Representing more than 50 diverse cultures from Alaska to Peru, these superb artifacts are complemented by innovative reconstructed environments and hands-on activities.

  • Frensley/Graham Hall of African Wildlife

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Frensley/Graham Hall of African Wildlife

    Unlike the traditional “menagerie” approach, this hall focuses on well-integrated themes of African wildlife ecology and conservation. Additionally, state-of-the-art interactives and video films enhance the experience.

    Explore seven biomes, each of which highlights a different theme relating to African Wildlife Ecology.

    Congo Basin: Explore uncharted wilderness in search of new species.

    West African Tropical Forest and Ethiopian Realm: Examine how primates and antelope co-exist.

    Serengeti Grassland: Observe intricate dynamics between predators and prey at many levels.

    Lowveld region: Survey the ecosystem and food chain, using the full complement of predators, prey and scavengers.

    Saharan Desert: Witness incredible birds migrations.

    Okavango Delta: Learn about the importance of water for organisms to survive.

  • Hamman Hall Of Texas Coastal Ecology

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Hamman Hall Of Texas Coastal Ecology

    The Texas coast is a natural treasure to many Texans, but few know about its ecologic and economic importance. The Hamman Hall of Texas Coastal Ecology shows visitors how a healthy environment is paramount to maintaining and sustaining a healthy economy. With about 2400 square feet of floor space and a 120 foot wall space adjacent to the new Farish Hall of Texas Wildlife, guests learn about the environmental characteristics of the Texas coast, as well as critical habitats, iconic species, concerns and impacts, recreation, and opportunities for conservation and restoration.

    “The Texas coast provides seemingly unlimited resources of many kinds for business, industry, education, recreation, and simply, personal enjoyment,” said Wes Tunnell, HMNS Curator of Marine Biology. “Consequently, many people want to live, work, and play on the Texas coast. Therefore, it is important to balance what we take from and how we use the coast. We now know that a healthy coastal environment leads to a healthy and sustainable coastal economy, so it is important to protect the natural environment which in turn protects the economy.”

  • Vintage Texas Wildlife Dioramas

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Vintage Texas Wildlife Dioramas

    The new dioramas in the Education Wing have been a regular part of the museum for several decades. When their occupied space was deemed essential for renovation, museum staff was unable to simply throw away these dioramas with their rich and fine detail. Instead we decided to make an effort to do what museums do best – conserve these precious historical antiquities, preserving them for future generations to enjoy and appreciate.

    With research, we were able to determine when these incredible murals were painted. The Texas Gulf Coast scene is the oldest diorama on display. It was painted in the mid 1940s when the museum was located on its former grounds at the Houston Zoo. Initially this diorama was perhaps one-third its current depth; the walls were added in later years to match those of the other three. Travis Keese painted both the Prairie (1965) and Davis Mountains (1967) scenes during his tenure as museum staff artist (1964-71). The Big Thicket scene was done around 1969 by an artist name Harry Wortham. Keese was then contracted in 1996 to do conservation work on all of the murals, and also at that time painted the High Plains mural that is framed on the left. The murals were again touched-up by artist fabricators Brian Zievert and Robert Shuttlesworth during the 2014 reinstallation.

  • Farish Hall of Texas Wildlife

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park Dr
    Houston, TX 77030
    Farish Hall of Texas Wildlife

    The Houston Museum of Natural Science has had Texas Wildlife diorama displays since the early days when the museum was located across the street at the zoo. In 2014 several of the older murals underwent a renovation of supporting habitat and species, and today these vintage treasures can be viewed in the basement of the Education wing.

    Today’s version of the Farish Hall of Texas Wildlife is located on the 2nd floor, and showcases the remarkably diverse biomes of our beloved Lone Star State. Dioramas highlighting Piney Woods, Oak Motte, Coastal Prairie and Wetland are included as nearby regions, whereas South Texas Dry Forest, Guadelupe Mountains, and High Plains are further afield in other parts of the state. There are also kiosks focusing on extinct and vanishing species, invasive species in our state, and aberrantly colored individual animals.

    In total over 425 specimens representing approximately 250 species will be on display. Emphasis for this exhibit is placed on rare, endangered and extinct species. Over 50 species, more than 20% of those on display, are classified under some level of threat.

  • 1515 Hermann Dr

    The Health Museum
    1515 Hermann Dr
    Houston, TX 77004
    1515 Hermann Dr

    The Health Museum welcomes you to explore the complexity and vast impact of human microbiomes through the engaging exhibition The Secret World Inside You. The exhibition introduces the microbiome, how it is created, and how it effects the human body through interactive tables and activities. Explore your own ecosystem and learn all about the community of creatures that your immune system, digestive system and brain rely on daily. Physical health is not the only thing that microbes can affect; learn how your mental health, including conditions like depression, are impacted by your microbiome. You can also meet microbes up close through multiple projections. The McGovern Theater will showcase surprising films that reveal the wonders of the human microbiome for all ages to enjoy.

  • Stonewall 50

    Contemporary Arts Museum Houston
    5216 Montrose Blvd
    Houston, TX 77006
    Stonewall 50

    On June 28, 1969, a police raid of the gay bar Stonewall Inn in New York City, New York resulted in a revolt by its patrons. Their anger and frustration erupted into days and weeks of street protests that catalyzed cultural change as queer individuals realized their political power. Fed up with being persecuted for sexual and gender choices, queer communities and their allies began working both individually and in coalitions to advocate for self-determination, equality, and civil rights.

     

    Stonewall 50 is an exhibition conceived as a snapshot of the complexion, interests, and activities of a diverse group of queer and allied artists. Whether working in local communities or on other continents, these artists’ responses to the worlds around them—in photographs, paintings, films and videos, sculptures, performances, and other media—address a range of personal and collective concerns and desires. Stonewall 50 follows a number of paths: it traces artists’ engagement with trans visibility; suggests possibilities for formal and conceptual inter-generational dialogue; and looks outside the United States to consider queer issues abroad. While these themes provide a framework for the exhibition, the show’s contents are not limited to artworks exploring these notions. This exhibition is organized with an understanding that the privileges and disadvantages that affect the self-determination of sex and gender expression are linked inextricably to cultural perceptions around ability, age, nationality, race, wealth, and a host of other issues.

  • Death by Natural Causes

    Houston Museum of Natural Science
    5555 Hermann Park D
    Houston, TX 77030
    Death by Natural Causes

    Snakes. Spiders. Sharks.  The things you fear are the least of your worries! Death by Natural Causes will introduce patrons to the range of “animal, vegetable and mineral” dangers that lurk in their everyday lives.  Through a collection of specimens, text and interactives, visitors can see what can cause a death, either directly or indirectly, from the natural world. Poisonous, venomous and toxic are just a few of the terms that will be clarified, and things you interact with almost daily will be used as examples—mushrooms, snakes, spiders and even common foods! Old wives tales and urban myths will be debunked, as visitors travel through five general areas of rich graphics, compelling visuals and surprising specimens.

  • Icons of Style: A Century of Fashion Photography

    Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
    1001 Bissonnet
    Houston, TX 77005
    Icons of Style: A Century of Fashion Photography

    Explore the rich and varied history of fashion photography through Icons of Style: A Century of Fashion Photography. More than 200 photographs by famous practitioners and lesser-known, yet influential, artists trace the movement’s trajectory from niche industry to powerful cultural force, and its gradual recognition as an art form.

    Icons of Style showcases a broad and diverse view of fashion and fashion photography—from the elegant portraits of Harlem’s best dressed in the 1930s; to the trendsetting fashions of Beyoncé, David Bowie, Grace Jones, Run DMC, and Salt-N-Pepa; to images that have graced the pages of Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Ebony, and Essence. The exhibition features local, national, and international loans, augmented with works from the MFAH collections.

  • An American Visual Language: Specimens of Historic Wood Type

    The Printing Museum
    1324 W. Clay Street
    Houston, TX 77019
    An American Visual Language: Specimens of Historic Wood Type

    The use of wood as a tool for printing text has been employed for centuries. The Chinese first carved their alphabetical characters into individual pieces of wooden type in 868 CE. However, history, technology, and resources combined in an interesting way in nineteenth-century America, creating an aesthetic trend in printing that drew on historic type style and designs, but also innovated in news way that had not been seen before. As westward expansion brought Americans to settle across the country, the demand for printers and new printing technology also grew. The routing and pantograph machines allowed the forested land to be converted into wood type, which could be produced as a less expensive alternative to metal type. This new technology enabled new fonts to be developed around historiated letters that were typically used as display type. Now, entire alphabets of new fonts were created in a distinctly American aesthetic and in sizes not previously available.

    John Horn was first introduced to printing in high school in the mid-1960s. He would go on to work as a commercial printer for most of his life. After retiring in the 1980s he began collecting historic printing equipment and type and immersed himself in the history of printing and typography. He now is the owner of his own letterpress studio, Shooting Star Press, in Little Rock, Arkansas. He owns 2,700 fonts of metal type, 1,200 fonts of wood type, hundreds of fonts of line casting matrices and over 200 presses.  He draws largely from American Wood Type: 1828-1900, Rob Roy Kelly’s seminal text from 1977, for identifying and dating the wood type in his collection—situating American manufacturers as innovators in style.

    On display are selections of type specimens from The Printing Museum’s collection, which were printed in 2001-2002 by John Horn on his Vandercook Universal I Press.  The specimens consist of fonts that were produced by five type manufacturers:  Hamilton Manufacturing Company; William H. Page and Company; Vanderburgh, Wells & Company; Morgans & Wilcox; and Tubbs Manufacturing Company (also referred to as Tubbs & Company). These examples depict serif and sanserif fonts, including primary faces of Roman, Antique, and Gothic; secondary designs, such as Clarendon and Tuscan; and new families of type designs, such as Antique Tuscan. Further derivations can be seen in the condensed and expanded fonts, as well as Italic and outlined versions.

    On view in the Hallway Gallery. All prints on display are from the permanent collection of The Printing Museum.

  • Between Play and Grief: Selections from the Latino American Collection

    Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
    1001 Bissonnet
    Houston, TX 77005
    Between Play and Grief: Selections from the Latino American Collection

    Between Play and Grief: Selections from the Latino American Collection features a survey of works from the MFAH collection of modern and contemporary Latin American and Latinx art.

    The exhibition presents more than three dozen works of art acquired by the MFAH over the past 10 years. The selection spans six decades of artistic expression, from figures who were actively in dialogue with leading postwar artistic movements such as Nouveau Réalisme, Arte Povera, and Pop Art in the 1960s, to contemporary artists whose work speaks to their identities as both insiders and outsiders within an American experience.

    All of the artists in the exhibition rely on parody and dark wit to express social and political realities. Between Play and Grief includes the work of Amalia Mesa-Bains, Antonio Berni, Juan Carlos Distéfano, Alberto Heredia, Luis Jiménez, Rómulo Macció, César Augusto Martínez, Mondongo, Celia Alvárez Muñoz, Luis Felipe Noé, Marcos Raya, Vincent Valdez, and Jorge de la Vega.

  • William Forsythe: Choreographic Objects

    Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
    1001 Bissonnet
    Houston, TX 77005
    William Forsythe: Choreographic Objects

    This summer, the MFAH invites visitors to engage with the fundamental ideas of dance, weight, and movement in time. The immersive exhibition William Forsythe: Choreographic Objects blurs the lines between performance, sculpture, and installation.

    American dancer and choreographer William Forsythe is known for his groundbreaking combination of choreography, staging, lighting, and dance analysis. The artist (born 1949) has changed the landscape of contemporary dance with his focus on how the human body moves through space.

  • Young Writers Workshop

    Discovery Green
    1500 McKinney Street
    Houston, TX 77010
    Young Writers Workshop

    Presented by Writers In The Schools (WITS), the weekly Young Writers Workshop at Discovery Green is Houston’s only free and open writing workshop for kids. The class, which includes a craft provided by Houston Public Library, encourages children to express their thoughts and develop language skills.

  • THEN and NOW

    Art Car Museum
    140 Heights Blvd
    Houston, TX 77007
    THEN and NOW

    Ann and James Harithas are pleased to announce the opening of:THEN and NOW

    The longevity of a core group of artists, starting in the 80’s at U. of H. Lawndale, is the impetus for this show THEN and NOW.

    The LU group is unified by 40 years of friendship and art.

    This unique opportunity for an overview of 4 decades of work, with 2-3 pieces from each artist, will show their evolution of vision.

  • Saturdays in Smither Park

    The Orange Show Center for Visionary Art
    2402 Munger Street
    Houston, TX 77023
    Saturdays in Smither Park

    Enjoy Saturdays in Smither Park and watch Houston's newest and most creative green space evolve as local artists hand-place reused and repurposed material to mosaic the park's many structures. Spend time gazing at all the whimsical mosaics that have been completed including the rocketship, octopus, goldfish, and crazy cat lady. Bring a picnic lunch and hang out under the Vinson & Elkins Pavilion, start a spontaneous drum circle or performance in the Lindley Fish Amphitheater, or just enjoy relaxing on the swings. Bring family and friends to spend Saturday outdoors enjoying this unique, creative environment - and while you're there, make sure to visit The Orange Show Monument, located next door!Every Saturday, weather permitting.

  • Glass Art by Three Dimensional Visions Glass Blowing Houston

    Sawyer Yards
    1502 Sawyer Street #215
    Houston, TX 77007
    Glass Art by Three Dimensional Visions Glass Blowing Houston

    Looking for a unique gift for that special someone? Want to fill your space and your heart with something beautiful? Every piece in our gallery is a one of a kind glass art form. Come on out and select your hand made glass art to give to that special someone.

  • The Three Musketeers

    HUBBARD STAGE - ALLEY THEATRE
    Alley Theater, 615 Texas Ave
    Houston, TX 77002
    The Three Musketeers

    The swashbuckling classic!

    Young d'Artagnan is determined to be a Musketeer. The only problem is, girls aren't allowed. Or are they?

    Written in 1844 and adapted for the stage by Ivan Wilkinson, The Three Musketeers is set in Paris, France in the year 1626. Crime is rife, and the King's Musketeers are the most glamorous law enforcers and are known throughout the whole of France.

    D'Artagnan is a young girl who has grown up listening to the heroic stories of the Musketeers and, desperate to join them, disguises herself as a man and heads to Paris. She manages to befriend the King's three most favorite Musketeers, Athos, Aramis and Porthos, but before long, danger strikes and it comes in the form of evil Cardinal Richelieu and his wily sidekick? Milady de Winter, who have discovered that the Queen is having an affair with the Duke of Buckingham. and the four friends find themselves uncovering a deadly plot that could put the Queen and the whole of France in peril.

    Does this mean war with England? And will our heroes and heroine triumph? Get your tickets now to watch the plot, and all its duels and adventure unfold.

  • Murder for Two

    Stages Repertory Theatre
    3201 Allen Pkwy
    Houston, TX 77019
    Murder for Two

    The hit show that is selling out across the country is now coming to Houston! Everyone is a suspect in Murder for Two, a hilarious murder mystery with a twist. One actor plays the investigator, the other plays all 13 suspects, and both play the piano throughout! A zany blend of classic musical comedy and madcap mystery, this whodunit is a highly theatrical duet loaded with killer laughs.

  • Disney's Aladdin

    Broadway at the Hobby Center
    800 Bagby St
    Houston, TX 77002
    Disney's Aladdin

    Aladdin, adapted from the Academy Award®-winning animated Disney film and centuries-old folktales including “One Thousand and One Nights,” is brought to fresh theatrical life in this bold new musical. Aladdin’s journey sweeps audiences into an exotic world of daring adventure, classic comedy and timeless romance. This new production features a full score, including the five cherished songs from the Academy Award®-winning soundtrack and more written especially for the stage.

  • Invention Convention

    Children's Museum of Houston
    1500 Binz St
    Houston, TX 77004
    Invention Convention

    Step into a workshop of gadgets and gizmos where kids create, concoct and construct contraptions and use their imagination to become inventors!
    Dream-up and design in a workshop filled with half-finished contraptions, bins of spare parts, project tables, schematics and various instruments from floor to ceiling.

    Experiment with LEGO® bricks, propellers, magnets, batteries, switches and buzzers through facilitated, hands-on experiments and mini-workshops.

  • Pride and Joy - The Marvin Gaye Musical

    BROWN THEATER
    Wortham Center, 500 Texas Ave,
    Houston, TX 77002
    Pride and Joy - The Marvin Gaye Musical

    Experience the rollercoaster story of Motown legend Marvin Gaye's life and love with Anna Gordy Gaye, the lady boss record executive, businesswoman, composer and songwriter who stole his heart. Brought together by music, their tale is now immortalized and told through by classic Gaye songs like 'Heard It Through The Grapevine', 'What's Going On', 'Inner City Blues' and 'Let's Get It On' in a brand new touring production of 'Pride & Joy - The Marvin Gaye Musical'. 

    Set against the backdrop of the rise of Motown records, the musical is narrated by the couple themselves as they take audiences on a journey through their courtship. The sister of Motown founder Berry Gordy, Anna rose through the ranks to form her own label. An artist signed to her brother's legendary record company, Marvin fell deeply in love with the then 37-year old Anna and because of their 17 year age gap their love was forbidden. Despite protests from friends and family, they married in 1963 and their marriage, however tumultuous, proved the inspiration for many a song.